The Norfolk BroadsThe Norfolk Broads
Username Password
Norfolk Broads Weather

Mon, 11 Apr 2016 7:20 am BST- Light Rain
5 Day Forecast

Wind 2.0 mph @ 40°
48.0°F/8.89°C Humidity 93% Pressure 29.65 (S)

Welcome to The Norfolk Broads Forum
This is THE Worlds Largest Forum devoted to the Norfolk Broads, here you can discuss issues about the Norfolk Broads. Or just somewhere to chat with others interested in the Norfolk Broads area.

Please Help Support The Norfolk Broads Forum
OR

The Norfolk Broads Forum / Holiday Tales / Malanka 1953 - present
login
join
Graphics Off
Search
Forum Members - Book your Hoseasons holiday today, Just call 0345 498 6296

This is a moderated forum Reply to this DiscussionReply to Discussion | Start new discussionNew Discussion << previous || next >> 
Posted By Discussion Topic: Malanka 1953 - present

Similar Threads That Might Help :
Malanka 1953 - present| Malanka 1953 - present| Hearts Cruisers - Queen of Hearts Y408 - 1953| The 1953 Floods| First Overnight Cruise with Malanka|

-- Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

book mark this topic Printer-friendly Version  send this discussion to a friend  new posts last

fidear45
Oct-12-2012 @ 12:39 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Been Posting For a Long Time
Posts: 1632
Joined: Aug 2010
fidear45
          

Add To Ignore List
Jollymoon Thursday 27th September.

A day we will never forget.

Travelling to Norfolk from Belgium with the children still at school is somewhat problematical for us as there are three of them and they have to travel the 7km to school and back every day. Deciding to travel Thursday after school was easy but Friday meant Fiona had to negotiate to use the School bus pick up service. Brief explanations were all that was required and they were accepted onto the pick-up for Friday morning so we could travel to the wedding celebrations knowing the children would get to and from school with little or no fuss.

My boss is a very nice lady and had no objection to me leaving a few minutes early to get ready for the off whilst Fiona picked up the merry band from school Thursday afternoon. I arrived home changed into travelling clothes and packed the car with everything we would need for the short trip on Malanka. This included a Fiona special of almost cooked Caribbean Chicken which we intended to finish in the oven and have as our celebration dinner aboard Malanka on Friday with Charlie and Phil and Diane from Moonfleet.

Car packed and water topped up, the big black bus was eager for the off, last minute toilet performed and Martin was eager for the off. Cold cokes added to the car and I was still ready for the off. Slight problem was the absence of the Fiona plus children..10 minutes, twenty minutes, then thirty minutes and still no sign of the school crew. Even the dogs were sitting by the front door waiting! This isn’t that unusual as when they see bags with clothes in they all go and congregate by the door in some form of doggy beauty contest all with tails wagging in doggy versions of pick me! pick me! No doggies were going on this trip and for that we would be very grateful just a few hours later, but more on that to come as Fiona had arrived.

Biting back the witty rejoinder along the lines of “where the hell have you been” and replacing it with a bald, “we had better get a move on or we will be late for the train” we got into the bus and set off. It is not that thirty minutes overall would make a huge difference one way or another it was just that thirty minutes at this time of day and at the start of our journey could have many unintended consequences for the remainder of the trip.

Sadly my fears we in fact spot on and after only 10km we were at the back of a very long line of cars on the famous Brussels ring road designated the R0. Fortunately I have sat-nav and some local knowledge so came off the R0 and headed down the off ramp in vaguely the direction we wanted, hoping that Patricia (the sat nav lady) would guide me to where we wanted to go, unfortunately Pat kept pointing me back at the now fully gridlocked R0. Having already lost 40 or so minutes and now watching the expected arrival time slip past the last check in time for our train I was now hopelessly lost and a little embarrassed as I had just added just as much time as the tardy school run.  

To cap it all it had now started to pour with rain in that soak you to the skin in ten seconds kind of way and that just made the whole day perfect what more could happen.
Well a little piece of luck as Patricia regained her senses or got updated about the R0 and was now urging us to go in a different direction and the arrival time was coming back to do-able from you must be mad.

Missing the queue on the R0 we knew we would have another one of the A19 but there was nothing to do but wait. Nearly three hours later having covered the 210km and we made it to Calais with minutes to spare. We weren’t concerned about food as we planned to go to the chip Inn at Long Stratton and so we boarded the train.

Arriving in Folkestone we headed towards the M25 and the QEII bridge noting in passing that the charges for the bridge will be 2.00 from 1st October. As the bridge was fully paid for over ten years ago I couldn’t quite understand the need to increase the charge for using it.  

Quick squirt round the M25 and we headed up the A12 and a rendezvous with some lovely fish and chips. Or rather we would have if horrible weather, and every agricultural machine in Norfolk hadn’t been waiting for us at the end of the A12. Oh well we would miss the chips but could stop at Blue Boar lane 24hr Tesco and get something there to warm up and eat on the boat. New plan in place and shopping completed we arrived at Moonfleet where Phil had brought Malanka round for us after finishing off some necessary engine modifications the day before. Initial difficulties with the locked gate were overcome by me turning the  numerical padlock the other way up and we were unloading and anticipating a nice Indian with some Champagne to wind down after the multiple stresses of the stop start journey and last minute change of plans.  Unpacking completed, Chicken Korma and Chicken Jalfrezi meal for two gently heating in the oven, wine chilling in the fridge just the two of us on board and thoughts turning to a peaceful night together. How wrong was that to turn out to be!


My glass needed refilling (as often happens) so I decided to check out the dinner and see if it was ready, a quick check in the new oven (with real numbers that actually mean something) told me that it would be about ten more minutes so I refilled my glass and headed back to the saloon and the relaxing Fiona.
“What’s that smell” exclaimed Fiona. I paused and sniffed the air, “perhaps I moved the chicken too close to the flames in the oven I’ll go check”, I said.
A quick peak into the oven revealed no displaced plastic trays of Chicken Korma or Chicken Jalfrezi. However Fiona had by then recognized the source of the smell. Coming out of the heater vent from the engine compartment was a thin wisp of light grey smoke, the ebber was on and chugging away and suspecting this may be the cause immediately turned the unit off and headed to the wheel house to investigate.
I lifted one small inspection hatch in the floor of the wheelhouse and what had been a thin wisp of pale grey smoke became a solid column of dark grey acrid smoke that burned the back of my throat and immediately started me in a hard barking rasp of a cough as I tried and failed to catch my breath.

I must confess at this point in the tale that I have received fire training from Berkshire fire service and was now very grateful for the training.

I turned and in no uncertain terms politely requested Fiona to get the F*** out now and do it quickly. I knew I had to get some air as my ears were beginning to ring and I know what comes next, all this was going on in my mind as I heard Fiona unzipping the wheelhouse canopy on the other side of the boat and I felt the boat rock as she stepped down, the boat was continuing to fill with smoke as I unzipped my side panel and stuck my head out to gulp down some fresh air. Two quick breaths and I ducked back inside to lift the larger inspection hatch that would give me access to the now very obvious source of the smoke. Fiona called on me to get out and so knowing that was the sensible thing to do I climbed out of the boat and continued to open the canopy up from the outside to disperse the smoke. Both sides open and the smoke was less thick and appeared to be lessening in intensity. The reason for that became all too obvious as Fiona pointed to the engine bay where the smoke had been replaced with 20cm dancing yellow flames in the bay on the surface of the battery isolation unit.

I knew I had to do something, I couldn’t stand by and watch Malanka go up in smoke so I held my breath, dashed back inside and retrieved one of Malankas three powder fire extinguishers from the saloon. She also has two fire blankets as well. I pulled the tab, then pulled out the pin, aimed at the source of the fire and pulled the trigger. Powder, smoke and all sorts of stuff burst up out of the engine bay but the flames did not go out so I leaned in nearer and gave the source of the fire a good two second burst. Believe me that was a very long two seconds and then it was out.

Fiona and I stared at the wheel house floor and the now powder covered engine bay and looked at each other and just spontaneously hugged each other for a good three minutes.

The time was now quarter to eleven and we wondered what to do? We called Phil and asked if he could come and help us. Well, Phil came within ten minutes and he really did help us. He made safe the battery isolator, removed the offending items and then set about checking the safety of the boat for us. He had already made certain we had somewhere to stay by checking the availability of Lound Cottage for us.

Long story short over the next two hours he made the boat safe for us to stay on board and we even had lighting. Fiona and I opened up every window and door to remove the stench of burning insulation and liberally applied fabreeze to all the soft furnishings. It would not be until the mooring that we would be able to fully assess the damage caused by the smoke. Abruptly we were both very tired and so with every window open we fell into the sleep of the very fortunate. Thank You Phil…………    

More to come……


Life is too short

M&F

Forum Girly Swot 11.02.2011

TerryTibbs
Oct-12-2012 @ 12:53 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Harnser Trainer
Posts: 7140
Joined: Jul 2007
TerryTibbs
          

Add To Ignore List
Sounds like you had a lucky escape, good job you didn't go straight to bed. Hope the damage wasn't too bad.

Dave

if it is to be it is up to me!

fidear45
Oct-12-2012 @ 1:02 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Been Posting For a Long Time
Posts: 1632
Joined: Aug 2010
fidear45
          

Add To Ignore List
Thank you Dave
Fiona and I were very lucky indeed. Phil was superb and the damage was limited to cushions and soft stuff. Structurally she is fine, some charred bits in the engine bay but we didn't care about that to be honest we just felt we had such a lucky escape. we could have been asleeep and I don't even like to think about it.
She now has both smoke and CO detectors. When I fitted the CO one the next day it went off straight away.    

Life is too short

M&F

Forum Girly Swot 11.02.2011

Lysandra
Oct-12-2012 @ 1:12 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Knows Their Stuff
Posts: 126
Joined: Jun 2009
Lysandra
          

Add To Ignore List
Dear Both so very glad you are both safe and sound and the fire training worked so well.  Phil is indeed a top guy.  Take care and hope Malanka recovers soon.

Best wishes

Dean & Carol

If God had meant us to build fibre-glass boats He would have grown fibre-glass trees
IP8 NR12

16E
Oct-12-2012 @ 4:23 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Been Posting For a Long Time
Posts: 1576
Joined: Dec 2007
16E
          

Add To Ignore List
Well done both. Scary things those electrical fires.

As a railway employee I used to get a serious dose of practical fire training every year and electrical ones were always tricky until you could cut off the electrical supply.

I once had an electrical fire on a container on the back of a lorry in the middle of Buxton - no isolator switch, no spanners and no time to wait for the cavalry.  I found a loop in the battery cable and kicked and kicked till it ripped off and the fire could be put out.  The boss almost tried to tell me off for damaging the wiring and socket.

We also found a Broom at Ant mouth with smoke coming out of the wheelhouse and a very scared couple on board.  We made sure the engine was off, batteries isolated and charring out before we towed them to S Walsham and he had to tell his dad the news.

Mal
16E

I am always amazed at the theraputic properties of chocolate digestives.

garryn
Oct-14-2012 @ 9:39 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 596
Joined: Dec 2010
garryn
          

Add To Ignore List
This all sounds very scarey. Your quick thinking saved the day.
We never had this problem on our time on Malanka as the only elecrics on board were the lights and the electrics to the engine. In later years we did have a tv installed.


Garry

fidear45
Oct-22-2012 @ 1:28 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Been Posting For a Long Time
Posts: 1632
Joined: Aug 2010
fidear45
          

Add To Ignore List
Saturday. The Jollymoon…

It was a lovely, slow start to the day.  The sun was shining brightly and behind the canvas the wheelhouse was toasty and warm.  After filling up with water and diesel and transferring the magnificent wedding cake from Charlie’s car to the boat we set off from Moonfleet sometime between 9.30 – 10am.  It was a pleasant but quiet trip down the Ant, the trees and bushes just changing into their vibrant autumn colours and the river quite still and sparkling in the early morning sunshine.  There were a couple of slow Richo’s boats, who were obviously only just getting the hang of things and a few other boats still on wild moorings.  We spied Gary (ZTD) just leaving one such wild mooring (our favorite one) on Delilah and they followed us downriver.  

Charlie was at the wheel on the approach to Ludham Bridge, the usual banter about whether she was brave enough to take her through was of course forthcoming but soon died when we realised just how close it was going to be and I took over near the bridge.  Fiona was dispatched to eye the gap and Gary was asked via wavy hand signals to hang back a bit and let the loony in charge have a go.

I inched forward and then Fiona indicated that it was doable and we went for it, when half under the bridge we discovered there was only about an inch to spare. Gary has photos of the loony with the canopy up (that would be us!) We shared a wave with LBBY and tooted ‘Happy Birthday’ to George before heading off for St Benet’s Abbey and the rendezvous.
  
On final approach to the moorings I made the decision that I would turn in order to go against the wind as it was significantly stronger than the tide, gap selected and crew (Fiona and Charlie) dispatched out on deck and quickly grasping something to hang on to when they realised just how blowy it was.  Someone helpfully took ropes for us but unfortunately a combination of the wind catching Malanka, a gentle pull on the ropes and the high tide meaning that the fenders were useless meant that we made an unanticipated hard contact with the quay much heavier than any of us would have liked.  I winced and I knew some paintwork was lost and maybe a displaced plank or some other disaster may have just happened. What more could go wrong on this such a lovely weekend?

Spare sausage fenders were deployed and ropes were just being settled when I noticed Fiona struggling to hold the boat against the wind and leaped off the boat to help. Arriving next to her the rope was slack and as she pulled it my foot slipped on the wooden quay heading and I knew it, I was going in!  In seconds the shout went up that I was in the water.  I had leaped for the pulpit rail and just caught it in my right hand my left was on the support rail, unfortunately the bow rope was across me and as Fiona pulled the rope it tightened and I knew my grip was going to fail, with a last gasp I turned and in I went with a great splash and an expletive frozen on my lips. Charlie and Fiona immediately ran to the edge and I swam as hard as I could for the side, with what I was wearing, including shoes, it was not easy. With the high water I easily hauled myself out and the ladies were there just in time to see me climbing out, dripping and not in the best of humours.  Now it was time to be grateful for such a high tide as getting out otherwise may have been more of a challenge.  As it was I was only in for a few seconds and only a few feet out from the quay. Despite arguing that it wasn’t that cold the two ladies and everyone else (thank you all especially Phil from Rondonay) sent me inside to strip off the wet things and change.  On reflection how I managed to swim to the side in the fleece I was wearing I will never know, probably a mix of annoyance at falling in and adrenaline from the leap and subsequent fall, who knows. My fleece was still on the bank where I had dropped it after climbing out and Fiona had wrung some of the water out of it and Charlie could still barely lift it, it really was that heavy once full of water.  
OK stress over and  changed, hugs and reassurances were exchanged and I managed to force a cup of hot sweet tea down.
  
We had a walk about, meeting up with all the forum members who were gradually turning up and telling tales of fires and fallings in and general hellos and haven’t seen you for a while kind of thing.  BA and Corsica soon arrived and Loreen was hard at work with balloons and ribbons. Charlie went to take the cards for Lynsey and Mark and also deliver ‘Thank You’ cards for the CinC to Paul, Griff, Simon and, myself on behalf of everyone who had enjoyed our last gathering.

On returning to boat I spotted a large yacht under full sail storming up river and heading straight for us, luckily they managed to veer off a little missing Malanka’s paintwork by a matter of inches.  Unfortunately the yacht didn’t manage to veer quite enough for poor Rondonay which was moored in front of us.  There was heavy contact which lifted Rondonay virtually out of the water and onto the quay heading, undid her bow rope and knocked off a couple of fenders.  The yacht continued with sails flapping, hitting the quay hard before bouncing back out into the river, however, I was pleased to see that the sail was dropped and they were attempting to turn to head back.  
Pauline and Phil were called back to the boat, thank goodness they weren’t aboard at the time, to check the damage.  It seemed that although the hull seemed fine, the masts have been briefly tangling and their backstay snapped.  All that was holding the mast up and stopping it from falling was the bunting, the weekend had to get better soon!

Ad hoc repairs were made and details exchanged all very cordially and the shaken up crew of the large yacht left under power, they had underestimated the strength of the wind.  
Wandering up and down the windswept quay and fretting about how I was going to get off in this wind Lisa, Leigh and Keith were spotted and a hearty greeting exchanged.  Lynsey and Mark were reported to be en-route and we all gathered around Broad Ambition in anticipation of seeing the happy couple.  Griff cranked up the wedding march and a slightly tearful looking Lynsey brought Swan Ranger alongside BA with consummate skill.  Cheers, claps and congrats were called out.  The instructions for the day explained to the Bride and Groom, who had been virtually in the dark, and cameras went off all around.  Disappointedly we waved Lisa off and headed back to the boat.

My earlier apprehension was well founded and there was a little bit of hassle getting off the mooring due to everyone leaving at the same time and the wind causing havoc but with a little judicious use of the ever sensitive throttle we were soon in our place in the convoy.  
Charlie was given the honour of helming Malanka in convoy whilst I took my glass of wine for a walk to the foredeck to survey the truly impressive scene unfolding around us, and of course exchange the usual insults and banter with Simon, who was in front of us.    The cruising in company part of the day was over all too soon, next up rafting!  On arrival at Salhouse Broad we hung back to allow BA to take up station and then slide neatly in beside Corsica, it didn’t take long for all the boats to be rafted and everyone was summoned to their foredecks for photo opportunities.  It was a neat departure and as the ranger had been sent in to clear the reserved section of the quay!! Mooring was far less stressful than earlier in the day.  
Barbecues were set up and Charlie did a great line in fetching and carrying keeping Fiona and I supplied with bits and pieces and the ever present glass of wine.  Fiona ‘rustled up’ some fantastic burgers, Mike had brought some “yummy” pork and Sonia produced a whole duck! I did some barbecuing stuff and the food seemed to go down well with everyone.

Lynsey and Mark were presented with the cake which Charlie had brought (made by Michelle R at her work) and more tears were forthcoming from bride groom and quite a few others.

Much chatting, mingling and drinking followed, including the announcement of  Mike and Pat’s engagement.  As a stunning full moon began to rise and the light disappear everything began to get a little chilly so things were packed away and barbecues became bonfires to keep everyone warm.  A game of Mr and Mrs had been planned for those who wished to take part which was in fact a fun end to our evening. Charlie had disappeared or as she puts it “retreated to the boat” but had used the time to play galley slave by doing the washing up!
  
Fiona and I returned to the boat after the Mr and Mrs absolutely freezing and shivering. Nothing else for it, so Champagne was cracked open and attempts to warm up were made by consuming it.  We all had a lovely chat, only stopping when we moved briefly to watch a beautifully lit up trip boat go through the broad blasting out the slightly less classy, S club 7. Too quickly the champagne bottle was empty and the kettle put on for “the best drink of the day!”. Everyone went to their own cabins to put on thick jammies and we continued to chat while we had tea then suddenly with no warning it was midnight and time for some sleep after a most exciting and unexpected weekend.  Somewhere along the moorings, someone more hardcore than us was still outside and having great fun and we drifted off to sleep to the happy sounds of laughter and fun. What a good day!!!    


Life is too short

M&F

Forum Girly Swot 11.02.2011

oldbroadsbird
Oct-22-2012 @ 2:07 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 222
Joined: Jan 2011
          

Add To Ignore List
Fidear - excellent account - and I'm so sorry for your troubles. The positives might be that the fire and the dousing were tests that you and your crew were equal to. (I've added to my list/Jason's that is!,) the relevant detectors, and a lesson on how to isolate the electric's.
You take care and I look forward to your next 'trouble free' account.

broadsbird

fidear45
Oct-22-2012 @ 4:37 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Been Posting For a Long Time
Posts: 1632
Joined: Aug 2010
fidear45
          

Add To Ignore List
Thanks Hopefully (he says)

That will be after the half term holiday when we are floating for a week provided the weather co-opertates.

This is of course the second anniversary of the first Malanka shakedown cruise which had us with a whole sequence of mishaps from no hot water to blocked fuel filters and culminating in no elctricity at all and staying at the Old Rectory in Crostwich by wednesday night...This lead to the complete re-wiring of the boat in 2011.

Even with all that we wouldn't change anything, apart from the fire which was just to close for comfort)

Malanka is a family member now..The nicest thing is the smiling faces wherever we go, everyone smiles at us. Its lovely.

Will wave in your general direction next time we go past Barnes...

Life is too short

M&F

Forum Girly Swot 11.02.2011

readyabout
Oct-22-2012 @ 4:41 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 785
Joined: Aug 2010
readyabout
          

Add To Ignore List

quote:"......Lynsey and Mark were reported to be en-route and we all gathered around Broad Ambition in anticipation of seeing the happy couple. Griff cranked up the wedding march and a slightly tearful looking Lynsey brought Swan Ranger alongside BA with consummate skill........"

So I noticed from the video; looks like he's certainly made a good choice of partner there!

An exciting report - though I'm sure that in this particular instance you could have done with a little less action and a little more conversation....

Regards,

Paul
______________________________________________________
'readyabout' - the first meaningful adult phrase of my childhood....

PAGE: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Home Photo Gallery Days Afloat Contact Us
Chat Room Downloads Norfolk Broads @ Amazon Make My Logo
Shops & Businesses Members Gear Norfolk Broads @ EBay Holiday Calendar
Pub Guide Tide Tables SOS List Popular Threads
2017 Calendar Contest Make A Donation Links Hireboat Info
Norfolk Broads @ CafePress FAQ Broads Quiz Forum Events
Advertise With Us Forum Shop Boating Bits Stickys and FAQs Boating Bits Hirecraft List

 

 

 



Copyright © 2005 Y2KInternet, All Rights Reserved.