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The Norfolk Broads Forum / General Chat / Advice on buying a broads cruiser
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Advice on buying a broads cruiser

Similar Threads That Might Help :
buying a new broads cruiser| buying a new broads cruiser| Buying a Cruiser.| Help/advice - liveaboard/rent/buy| boat buying advice|

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AnnaF
Dec-05-2006 @ 11:38 AM                           Permalink
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Hi,

I'm hoping to buy a Norfolk Broads Cruiser and was wondering whether anyone could give me some advice. I have never bought a boat before and am hoping that the cruiser will become my home. I saw a beautiful cruiser at the weekend, it is almost thirty years old though and is made from GRP. Is there a life expectancy for GRP / broads cruisers? Do they generally hold their value? Are there any problems I should be aware of? Also how robust are they? I am hoping to moor on the Thames (tidal) and am also hoping to take it on the canals sometimes, people have told me that sometimes boats get a bit bashed around on canals (and with tidal patterns could potentially land on a shopping trolley or similar?!)! Also I've been quoted £350 for a survey, does this sound reasonable?

Any information would be very gratefully received.

Many thanks,

Anna

Glen_Mist
Dec-05-2006 @ 1:12 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Anna, firstly welcome to the forum. About buying a boat i can't gine you any technological advice but what i will say is that as with purchase this large, always buy with the head rather than the heart (i know it may sound callous but take it from somebody who has made that mistake before with an old, and very expensive, Daimler).
Regarding the survey, i'm not sure whether this is good value or not (mine was done by a boat building friend for the price of a good drink), but what price £350? It could literally save you thousands later on. My old Birchwood (also GRP, 36 years old and still very sound) was relatively inexpensive (in boating terms) but i still had a survey carried out.
As to ex hire cruisers, yes they do get battered about, but are probably bette maintained than a lot of private craft and are invarioubly quite a bit cheaper.
Boats are probably the next best thing to property to holding value, especially when it comes to boats 'of a certain age' (although i stand to be corrected) as long as they are well maintained and looked after the value should drop by very little.
I know i haven't said that much, but i'm sure that there will be others on here more than happy to give extra advice.

Chris James

"Darling, where is that water coming from?"

Antares_9
Dec-05-2006 @ 1:15 PM                           Permalink
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Hi and welcome to the forum, firstly £350 sounds cheap for a really full survey, make sure the survey is done by a qualified marine surveyer who is a member of the federation and is a FULL survey not just a report from a boatyard, that is no criticism of yards, just the surveyer will have insurance against not picking up on stuff they should have noticed. Remember this is going to be your home.

Ex broads hire cruisers seem to be laid up quite heavily and the Thames mud is prety soft but make sure any surverey knows that you will need to take the ground twice a day.

Tidal Thames moorings with resedential status are as rare as rocking horse droppings so you are very lucky indeed to have found one. As for the canals, the Grand union, Lee navigation et al have little or no rise and fall so that should not be a problem. You may have issues with beam in some of the locks further up the canals though.

GRP is robust but not maintainance free, a survey will tell you of any lurking structural or high moisture content issues.

update on cat logic: "Dubito ergo cogito; cogito ergo sum" Rene Des Cat

This message was edited by Antares_9 on Dec-5-06 @ 12:17 PM

steve
Dec-05-2006 @ 2:48 PM                           Permalink
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hi Anna f ,
fistly welcome to the site ,it may help to look at the boat owners Q&A section , there is many qusetions and answers regarding buying a boat and using it as a liveaboard .
cheers  

steve and vicky

B17
Dec-05-2006 @ 5:01 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Anna,

£10 per foot for a survey sounds perfectly reasonable to me If not a little on the cheap side.

The best advise I can give you are already doing by having a survey by a reputable surveyor. I always recommend the guy who has done my last 2 pre-purchase surveys.

Gary Holmes from Sutton

01692 582173

There are many other reputable surveyors out there but this is the only one I have had recent dealings with. Perhaps others could put up their own recommendations.

Rod

You mean the other Starboard then...

Bounty
Dec-05-2006 @ 5:40 PM                           Permalink
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Avoid spending your last penny on a boat, as you will continue to spend on it after purchase. Don't underestimate this as any boat can be a money pit.

As mantioned, check the gauge of the canals you plan to use. Most of the central/southern ones are narrow. Up north, we have the pleasure(!) of wide gauge.

Look at plenty before you buy. There are good ones and some real sheds about.

JamesLons
Dec-05-2006 @ 8:56 PM                           Permalink
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Actually I've been talking to a boatyard owner this week about what to look out for on boats when buying he said the most important thing was to get a survey done for your peace of mind and insurance but the other thing he told me was about the ingress of fresh water through either damage, damaged window seals or around shower compartments, or loose leaky deck fittings never thought about that before but then again I don't know much about buying boats but loads of people on here will have the answers for you.

james

This message was edited by JamesLons on Dec-5-06 @ 8:01 PM

tidesmine
Dec-06-2006 @ 9:53 PM                           Permalink
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For what it is worth bought our boat just over a year ago from a reputable boatyard. Actually was not looking to buy at that time but opportunity could not be passed. Have been very pleased and used it over 12 weekends/weeks last season. Bought through Julies boatyard. Good sound advice.
www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/broker/text/JBS001

Cheers,
Tim

huggy
Dec-11-2006 @ 10:54 PM                           Permalink
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Anna, good luck with the purchase...but i would hope the £350.00 estimate for a survey would include an out of the water hull report. This might account for some £100 for a lift and hold crane and is something insurers would want to have sight of if covering for comprehensive.  Dont buy one without looking at the hull outside...Maybe your potential purchase is out of the water anyway..

....huggy

JennyMorgan
Dec-11-2006 @ 12:03 AM                           Permalink
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Yes, a survey is a must. But before forking out £350.00 use some common sense. If everything is badly painted, it looks like a D.I.Y. nightmare and the engine compartment is a tip then walk away from it, save your survey money for another boat. You don't need a surveyor to tell you its a waste of money. Only buy cheap if you have the know-how to make good.

Jenny Morgan,
Save the Broads,
Please sign:
http://www.petitiononline.com/nbroads/petition.html

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