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The Norfolk Broads Forum / General Chat / Why Reedham Quay not Reedham Staithe
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Why Reedham Quay not Reedham Staithe

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BroadsInMay
Apr-26-2005 @ 9:56 PM                           Permalink
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The thread started about Candle or Kendal dyke got me thinking about Reedham Quay.

Anybody know why it isn't referred to as Reedham Staithe ?

Dave

trambo
Apr-27-2005 @ 12:46 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Dave. Just a guess but could it be that Reedham was capable of taking sea going craft. The term staithe seems to relate to river craft as far as the Broads are concerned.

Fred

Boatboy
Apr-27-2005 @ 4:05 PM                           Permalink
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spot on - Quay normally refers to a commercial or trading mooring on the river associated with costal or sea going vessels.

A staithe relates to a village or town mooring for river traffic only.



So ends the lesson according to the Boatster.

BroadsInMay
Apr-27-2005 @ 10:02 PM                           Permalink
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Thank you for the info folks. It's nice to know these things !

Dave

Pulse
Jan-16-2011 @ 6:03 PM                           Permalink
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Reedham Quay today, a bit quiet apart from the dredger.


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quackers
Jan-17-2011 @ 8:18 AM                           Permalink
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Just to put a slightly different slant on the original topic, Reedham is one of the few places on the navigable Broadland rivers which didn't acquire a statutory Parish Staithe in the 19th century. Loddon is the only other one I can think of.

I presume the reason for this is that extensive use over many years by all and sundry had already established the moorings as a Public Quay under Common Law, so it wasn't necessary to ensure public access by statute.

Bill Saunders

Strowager
Jan-17-2011 @ 8:58 AM                           Permalink
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"Quay normally refers to a commercial or trading mooring on the river associated with costal or sea going vessels.
A staithe relates to a village or town mooring for river traffic only.
"


It's an old thread, but as it's been resurrected,  I don't think that can be right.

What about Burnham Overy Staithe and Brancaster Staithe then ?

All Broads "Staithes" were "commercial or trading moorings" when they were originally named, mainly for the use of Wherries.

Maybe the distinction is Ships, rather than Sea-Going or just local dialect....  Smile




This message was edited by Strowager on Jan-17-11 @ 8:04 AM

Boatboy
Jan-18-2011 @ 2:42 AM                           Permalink
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I don't know much about Burnham, but Brancaster Staithe is the name of the hamlet of course, the moorings there are Malthouse Quay, something which always sticks in my mind because of the association with Ranworth / Malthouse Broad

Still an intersting point Strow.

Regards
Paul - "Unsuspecting Tyro" Since 1985.

“Rivers know this: there is no hurry. We shall get there some day.”

SteveO
Jan-18-2011 @ 2:26 PM                           Permalink
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Oxford Dictionary online says : Staithe: (in the north and east of England) a landing stage for loading or unloading cargo boats.  Origin: Middle English: from Old Norse stoth 'landing stage'.

Down in the SE corner of England, we have the word "Stade", which means a landing stage and comes from the same root. On the NE coast of England, there is a place called Staithes. I suspect that wherever the Vikings were prevalent on coast or river the word "Staithe" or a derivation thereof, can be found.

Regards


Steve

He had bought a large map representing the sea,
  Without the least vestige of land:
And the crew were much pleased when they found it to be
  A map they could all understand.


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