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Posted By Discussion Topic: End of Paper Charts

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Philosophic
Aug-01-2022 @ 6:26 PM                           Permalink
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Well for those that like to use up to date paper charts...not for much longer.
The UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO) has announced that it will be phasing out the manufacturing of paper charts with the aim to completely end production by late 2026.  



Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.

Henry Ford

Cocklegat
Aug-01-2022 @ 7:29 PM                           Permalink
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ECDIS rules. Doing chart corrections on paper charts was always a massive job done by the Second Mate on deep sea vessels. The changeover from paper to electronic charts has lead to many accidents as people learn how to use the new system properly. Like anything new you have to learn the advantages and disadvantages between the different systems. For the yachtsman on a small budget I don't think it makes sense, for those with deeper pockets its the way to go. Just beware the pitfalls

Mercator
Aug-03-2022 @ 3:31 PM                           Permalink
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Having used ECDIS ( Transas Navi-Sailor 2400 ) since bringing a new build product tanker back from Singapore in early 1997, I can only echo the above sentiments from Cocklegat, although chart correcting was even more onerous for 2nd. Mates on the hectic coastal trade.

Mind you, I think paper charts will be missed even more so by deep sea engineers, who always seemed to be requesting old charts for use as replacement gaskets for various pieces of E.R. machinery etc.  Playful Wink   Smile .

Steve.

Steve & Maggie

Not quite an ancient mariner ...... though some say he was at sea before Pontius was a pilate !

Philosophic
Aug-03-2022 @ 5:23 PM                           Permalink
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When planning a trip that I have not done before, I like to use a large paper chart first for the "rough planning". I then input that route into the electronic gizmo which it will then check and to use use on the trip. At sea I like to have one plotter set with about 25Nm range, the other set for close detail.



Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.

Henry Ford

Cocklegat
Aug-03-2022 @ 7:39 PM                           Permalink
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Some years ago I sailed with an AB whose dad had worked for Great Yarmouth shipping company pre war. These coasters apparently sailed without charts! The Skipper and Mate learning the east coast routes and buoyage off by heart. Today we have so much information at our fingertips and yet accidents still happen.

Philosophic
Aug-03-2022 @ 8:27 PM                           Permalink
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In crisis management, too much information can be as dangerous as too little information.

On the subject of how navigation has become so much easier with the electronic gizmo available today and indeed affordable for the average sea going pleasure boat, I searched Google for this, which I found interesting:

The first Western civilization known to have developed the art of navigation at sea were the Phoenicians, about 4,000 years ago (c. 2000 B.C.E. ). Phoenician sailors accomplished navigation by using primitive charts and observations of the Sun and stars to determine directions.

Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.

Henry Ford

Cocklegat
Aug-04-2022 @ 9:57 AM                           Permalink
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People may be interested in know, up until the 1980's  merchant ships were navigated deep sea using the French 'Marcq Saint-Hilaire method' dating back to the 1870's to calculate a position line. The equipment consisted of a sextant, wind up chronometer, set of tables (Nories) and a nautical almanac. The calculation along with a noon latitude worked out on paper using a 2B pencil and (until the calculator came along in the late 70's) logarithms. The fix was once a day with a possible two other, dawn & dusk fixes using stars. On a North Atlantic run it was not unusual to have no fixes the entire run, relying instead on dead reckoning (guesswork) Hull trawler men sailed up to Iceland without any such equipment, simply going!
All these methods relied on an understanding of probability. An imaginary circle around any type of fix based on the probable error. In the case of dead reckoning this could be pretty large. A noon position might have a much smaller probability error. Allowing this margin of error is basic to the understanding of navigation and is still pertinent today. GPS should still be considered to have a margin of error along with the information on a chart, electronic or otherwise. While much smaller the temptation to pass unnecessarily close to a hazard should be avoided. Smaller yachts often get close to such hazards but understanding these limitations can improve safety.

Philosophic
Aug-04-2022 @ 11:58 AM                           Permalink
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Apparently Columbus did not discover America, the Vikings were there some five hundred years earlier.
For Columbus to find the "Americas", can be seen to be quite easy...sail out of Plymouth, turn right and head in an westerly direction until you reach a massive piece of land, somewhere on its eastern shore. The incredible achievement in my mind was getting back to England not once but four times.

Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.

Henry Ford


This message was edited by Philosophic on Aug-4-22 @ 11:59 AM

Cocklegat
Aug-04-2022 @ 3:42 PM                           Permalink
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Its a long time since I've read about the voyages of Columbus. Columbus only landed on various islands in the Caribbean and never made it to the mainland. His method of navigation was twofold. Measuring the angle of the Pole Star above the horizon gave him a good indicator of Latitude, the lower the star the lower the latitude and he knew the angle when he was in Portugal. (This method predated Columbus) Taking the trade wind route he headed south to the known Canary islands. He then proceeded west with the prevailing easteley winds.  On the first trip he kept records of the compass and observed it against the pole star. It being due North the compass 'North' should be (approximately) aligned with the star. He knew nothing of variation (difference between true North and Magnetic north) but he noted the changing direction of the compass card the further west he went. The story goes that on subsequent trips when the crew became fearful of ever seeing land he predicted they would see land in two days. This happened and it was down to the previous observations he was able to know. His route home was via the more northerly way, using the westerly winds. Still the same way that sailing yachts use today to get to the Caribbean.
It's suspected that Portuguese fisherman may have predated Columbus.  
The vikings of course didn't use a compass. They used a 'Sun Compass' best explains here
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspa.2013.0787



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