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Mon, 11 Apr 2016 7:20 am BST- Light Rain
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Where to go!

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LadyFate
Jun-19-2019 @ 7:37 PM                           Permalink
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Hi, can anyone help us, which would be better for my wife and I. We are moving our boat from the river Avon to the broads, however, it’s to tall for most of the bridges. Would we be better south or north broads. Our outlook is simply quite not to busy but easy boating. My wife is disabled and we have both retired. The boat is powerful enough for the sea but we would prefer not to. A perfect situation would be simply stopping on the river side and mooring up on the bank, occasion pub but solitude is our thing.

Kindest Regards, Nick &Caz

steve
Jun-19-2019 @ 8:35 PM                           Permalink
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Hi there ,
You could moor on either side of the broads , with the northern broads you do get large / tall cruisers , but you can cruise between wroxham on the river bure through to the southern broads , you can cruise the river thurne up to the bridge at potter heigham , you can cruise the river ant , but that would be a short cruise upto ludham bridge , you would however need to go through Gt Yarmouth at low tide to pass under the 2 bridges , along all of these routes are moorings and pubs ,
Southern broads you have the two swing bridges , which will open for you when no trains are expected to cross ,
St olaves has a low bridge , so I'd recommend keeping clear that part of the river Waveney ,
Beccles has two bridges , the A146 rd bridge is passable again with a low tide , the second bridge I'd say no if your boat is tall ,again there are moorings along these routes with some watering holes,
Good luck and keep us updated

steve and vicky
( apparently a moaner)


This message was edited by steve on Jun-19-19 @ 8:41 PM

ruby
Jun-19-2019 @ 8:42 PM                           Permalink
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Hi

To meet your requirements the decision really makes itself. SOUTH. There are fewer low bridges, it is quieter, there are lots of Riverside pubs and there are far more seagoing boats kept on the southern rivers.

The only downside for you is that the tides are far more powerful which can make mooring and boarding etc more difficult for less mobile bodies.

Have fun

Graham

Paladine
Jun-19-2019 @ 11:02 PM                           Permalink
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"A perfect situation would be simply stopping on the river side and mooring up on the bank..."

You must bear in mind that the southern rivers do not lend themselves to wild mooring, due to the fast tidal flows and ranges. The northern rivers are much more accommodating in this respect.

On another thread, you said your boat's airdraught is 8'5". In which case, the only bridges it won't get through on the northern rivers are Wroxham and Potter Heigham bridges. Many boats kept up north won't go through them either. Ludham Bridge is eminently doable, giving access to one of the nicest parts of the Broads, the Upper Ant.

"..for the avoidance of any doubt, the broads are not legally a national park and do not come under the national park legislation, and nor will they."
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for DEFRA (Hansard 2015)

ruby
Jun-19-2019 @ 11:13 PM                           Permalink
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True but it is not exactly quiet for much of the year.

Paladine
Jun-19-2019 @ 11:36 PM                           Permalink
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That begs the question, 'why are the northern rivers more popular than the southern rivers?' A subject for a separate thread, perhaps.

"..for the avoidance of any doubt, the broads are not legally a national park and do not come under the national park legislation, and nor will they."
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for DEFRA (Hansard 2015)

Steve51
Jun-20-2019 @ 9:01 AM                           Permalink
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Another thought, you say your wife is disabled. Getting on and off the boat may be easier on the northerns with a tidal rise and fall measured in inches (mostly), as opposed to feet on the southerns.

Steve. CM1 and NR12

ruby
Jun-20-2019 @ 9:57 AM                           Permalink
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Indeed. My view is that the majority of Broads users are what I call potterers rather than cruisers. The South is good for cruising but the North is better for pottering. Added to that land has been traditionally cheaper in the North which has assisted the creation of two big hirefleets and their associated marinas.

LadyFate
Jun-20-2019 @ 3:11 PM                           Permalink
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Until I read your comments I was seriously considering Southern , however, to be honest I was not aware of the significance of the Southern tide changes. Really glad you have mentioned this as, yes mobility is an issue for us, this being the primary reason we are moving from the Avon, simply far to many locks and very few places to stop and then if you get to a mooring it’s lucky to find a space.

Kindest Regards, Nick &Caz

ruby
Jun-20-2019 @ 3:41 PM                           Permalink
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A point in the south's defence is that the tides are only really problematic on the yare East of Brundall and the waveney towards Somerleyton.

The Beccles area, Norwich, Rockland and the chet are all quite benign in comparison to Reedham and Yarmouth. And they are much quieter than the North which at certain times of year can be quite trying if you are looking to relax and unwind.

Just a thought but could you contrast and compare before making a final decision. Until you have tried  them both you will not really know which suits you best.



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