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The Norfolk Broads Forum / Broads Boat Owners Q & A / Stainless steel Rigging
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Stainless steel Rigging

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billmaxted
Mar-28-2005 @ 8:43 AM                           Permalink
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Have any of you saily types had any problems with Stainless Steel rigging cable from Norfolk Marine?

I ask because last september we replaced the winch cable which winds the canopy of one of our boats, it can only have gone up and down less than a dozen times. On Saturday it parted which was not good news  and at the moment we cannot see why. I just wondered whether there had been a faulty batch or something. No signs of abrasion just seems to have snapped. The canopy is heavy but suffers far less strain that would be applied on a fully rigged yacht.   Question

You don't have to tell us anything my Brother in Law has a boat on the upper Thames  Bill...

This message was edited by billmaxted on 3-28-05 @ 7:45 AM

roya
Mar-28-2005 @ 8:47 PM                           Permalink
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Bill not sure why you are asking here .
Check your invoice and return broken cable to suppliers.
i had a quick look and it looked like standard bowden cable to me
cheers for now.

roya

Poppy
Mar-28-2005 @ 8:49 PM                           Permalink
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I replaced the standing rigging on my sailing cruiser last year, and went to the lifting and rigging dept at Builders Supplies, in City Road, Norwich. (Very competitive!)
I enquired about using stainless ( the original was galvanised.
"What do you want that stuff for? That'll cost three times the price."

"Won't it last longer?", I replied.

He slowly looked me up and down, and said in a slow Norfolk drawl "Galvanised will see you out old partner."

I ordered galvanised! ( I might add that I am a reasonably fit mi fifty year old)

billmaxted
Mar-29-2005 @ 8:40 AM                           Permalink
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It's something we change on a regular basis because if a hirer overwinds the winch the ends can get kinked but this had got half along. I just thought I would mention it in case anyone needed to be put on notice. We use stainless because it seems to coil back on the winch wheel more smoothly and therefore more evenly.

You don't have to tell us anything my Brother in Law has a boat on the upper Thames  Bill...

BarnacleBill
Mar-29-2005 @ 2:49 PM                           Permalink
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Dons plastic Tefal forehead...

As a point of interest (or not), some types of stainless steels are unsuitable for high stress applications where they may be exposed to chlorides (e.g. a salt water environment), as stress cracks can develop.  Don't know if this applies to extruded wire though.

Removes plastic Tefal forehead...

billmaxted
Mar-29-2005 @ 3:36 PM                           Permalink
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Think there must have just been something odd about that lot. s/s 5mm Flexiwire max loading around 2.5 tons a canopy going 7ft cannot get anywhere near that. very Odd.

You don't have to tell us anything my Brother in Law has a boat on the upper Thames  Bill...

rustic
Sep-09-2012 @ 3:37 PM                           Permalink
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Rather than start a new thread, I was talking to a man at a boat
jumble earlier today, in Cheshire, and he was selling his old yacht  
rigging, for handrails,  domestic use etc

He said that his insurance company insists that the rigging on his 35
footer is replaced every 10 years.

Is this the case of every insurance company?

best regards, Richard.
I can't wait to be back on our boat on
the Broads.


This message was edited by rustic on Sep-9-12 @ 3:40 PM

davidstamford
Sep-09-2012 @ 11:14 PM                           Permalink
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If our insurance company is typical the replacing of rigging after a stated number of years only applies if insuring for racing. I don't know wheather that means that we would not be insured for rigging failure if not insured for racing.

David

Teadaemon
Sep-10-2012 @ 12:31 PM                           Permalink
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Quite a lot of insurance companies will insist that stainless steel standing rigging is replaced every 10 years, whether the boat is insured for racing or not.

This is because the most reason for stainless steel rigging to fail is fatigue, and there are few or no warning signs that it's going to break before it does so. Since the cost of new standing rigging is a small fraction of the cost of a whole new rig, periodic replacement is a sensible precaution.

Of course nobody has ever come up with a decent scientific argument why it should be every 10 years rather than every 9, 12, 15, etc - basically somebody pulled a number out of their backside, thought 'that looks about right', and that's pretty much what the whole industry has been working to ever since.

Of course galvanised steel wire is very different, much more tolerant to fatigue and it gives loads of warning before it's likely to go.

Brendan Burrill Dip Comp. DipMarSur (YS) GradIIMS

Burrill Marine Services surveys, consultancy, project management

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