The Norfolk BroadsThe Norfolk Broads
Username Password
Norfolk Broads Weather

Mon, 11 Apr 2016 7:20 am BST- Light Rain
5 Day Forecast

Wind 2.0 mph @ 40°
48.0°F/8.89°C Humidity 93% Pressure 29.65 (S)

Welcome to The Norfolk Broads Forum
This is THE Worlds Largest Forum devoted to the Norfolk Broads, here you can discuss issues about the Norfolk Broads. Or just somewhere to chat with others interested in the Norfolk Broads area.

Please Help Support The Norfolk Broads Forum
OR

The Norfolk Broads Forum / Broads Boat Owners Q & A / Opinions on different boat builders
login
join
Graphics Off
Search
Forum Members - Book your Hoseasons holiday today, Just call 0345 498 6296

This is a moderated forum Reply to this DiscussionReply to Discussion | Start new discussionNew Discussion << previous || next >> 
Posted By Discussion Topic: Opinions on different boat builders

Similar Threads That Might Help :
banhams of cambridge boat builders | banhams of cambridge boat builders | Wooden Boat Builder "Freebody" on the Thames BB1| Norfolk boat builders predict sales boom after Lon| Kids' opinions on boating on the norfolk broads |

-- Page: 1 2

book mark this topic Printer-friendly Version  send this discussion to a friend  new posts last

plesbit
Apr-24-2006 @ 11:37 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Lives to Post
Posts: 1134
Joined: Mar 2006
plesbit
          

Add To Ignore List
Yes - more questions!

Further to my previous investigations, this weekend I have viewed several boats of interest in the broadland area.  I was just wondering what opinions people had of the boat makers.... reliability, hull designs, reputation etc

The three boats are:

- A Princess 32
- A Fairline Mirage 29
- A Colvic 28

Whilst I thought the Colvic made imaginative use of the space, some of the others thought it felt very claustrophobic so I think it unlikely we'll go much further with that.

The other two were more interesting except the Princess seemed rather battered to me.  The window frames looked a state (I thought they were rusty, but on closer inspection it was mostly mold and gundge) and there were lots of problems with the trim, external and internal.  The internal trim was mostly that bits of the fittings were coming loose and didn't go together properly.  The external trim was mostly around the top of the cockpit where a canvas type fitting had become solid and was coming away from the GRP cockpit roof just about everywhere.  All cosmetic and easily fixed I was assured.  Possibly true, but there was quite a bit to do and I can see it starting to add up.

The Fairline Mirage looked in much better nick, externally but the bloke disappeared and we couldn't get inside.  We found another one at a different yard and had a look inside, and thought it was very nice but that one was petrol.  However the yard has a diesel one coming in later in the week.

Before I come all the way up from Kent to look at that one, I'd be interested if people can tell me anything about these boats (late 70s / early 80s builds).

Simon

Australia Travel Site

bobuk
Apr-25-2006 @ 5:52 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Learning The Ropes
Posts: 16
Joined: Apr 2006
          

Add To Ignore List
Simon, I havent owned any of these boats so cant help with the original question. But just a thought, it may be worthwhile looking at boats down your way and getting one moved up. I have had two of my boats transported up here, with no problems and not as expensive as you think. The possibility of boats being more expensive further south is offset by the greater availability.
Cheers Bob

Dibbler
Apr-25-2006 @ 9:36 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Moderator
Posts: 8129
Joined: Mar 2005
Dibbler
          

Hi Simon...

We have a Princess 33 and the build quality is superb. Really solid construction. Built 1982 by Marine Projects (Now Princess Cruisers I believe).

Fairline make superb craft too as is reflected in the 'robust' second-hand prices! The Mirage is IMHO one of the nicest medium-sized craft available. Great design and a very good looking boat.

Don't know much about Colvic though. Heard of them but no first-hand experience.

Some of the Princess 32's (and 33's) are indeed looking a little tired these days (32's are 1970s builds) but are still a good solid boat and tend to 'scrub up' nicely. A lot of them are twin engined and so your maintenance costs are a little higher but you have the option to do coastal and estuary stuff as well if you wish. They aso tend to have deeper hulls which can be an extra consideration at low tides at certain places on the Broads (ours draws 3' of water).

As regards the price difference across the country...we have found that there is a definite "Broads Tax" when buying boats from brokers/vendors on the Broads. This can represent quite a considerable difference from boat prices in other areas of the country at times. Sometimes running into several thousand pounds of difference.

We bought our boat from Newark in Nottinghamshire and had her transported to Norfolk, cost of which was around the £350 mark. Good value IMHO. Chap called Kingsley Farrington (from Norwich) did the transporting for us. There is a Marina called Burton Waters near Lincoln which has a fair few Sealine and Fairline boats for sale. Might pay you to have a look at their website too?



John

NEB
Apr-25-2006 @ 9:40 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 416
Joined: Jul 2005
NEB
          

Add To Ignore List
Hi Simon

As with all boats you will find good and bad examples.  Both the Fairline and Princess were in production for a while so there should be plenty to choose from.  I would be wary of the Colvic as I beleive a lot of these were home builds so the fit out could be suspect.
On the engine side definitely go for diesels.  For some reason Fairline favoured petrol and Princess perferred diesel for these models.  Be wary of Princess 32's with Volvo MD32's, they are a good engine but have aluminium cylinder heads which can warp, make sure the boat is trialled at full speed and keep an eye on the temperature gauge!!  Some spares are still available from Volvo and other sources but these are fairly old engines now.

Neil

NEB
Apr-25-2006 @ 9:41 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 416
Joined: Jul 2005
NEB
          

Add To Ignore List
Ooops, posted twice somehow !!

This message was edited by NEB on Apr-25-06 @ 8:44 AM

Dibbler
Apr-25-2006 @ 9:46 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Moderator
Posts: 8129
Joined: Mar 2005
Dibbler
          

Very wise counsel, Neil...especially the overheating bit.

Forgot about the 'frying tonight' factor with the MD32...lol!

Our port MD40 runs a little hotter than the starboard one when at full stretch but the calorifier is on the starboard engine so that's perhaps why?

John

plesbit
Apr-25-2006 @ 10:32 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Lives to Post
Posts: 1134
Joined: Mar 2006
plesbit
          

Add To Ignore List
Thanks for all that.

I had heard of the Princess boats from previous conversations on this board.  The Fairlines I knew about only because there seem to be quite a few for sale.  The Colvic has pretty much been ruled out already.  I had not heard of them at all.

The Princess was light and roomy - but tatty.  The engines are twin Perkins 4108 diesels but with a maximum speed of 8-10kts I wondered whether I'd feel safe taking her out into the sea as it doesn't sound like she would have much in reserve if you got into trouble.

But the amount of "minor" work required is something which concerns me.  She is fine as she is, and the hull was recently compounded and polished and a new canopy fitted.  It is really the condition of the window frames and around the top of the cockpit which concerns me, that and the amount of internal trim in the living area which is falling off.  She is also 3ft longer than the Fairline which will put the running costs up somewhat.

The Fairline, on the other hand, is cosmetically in very good nick.  She's about 5 years younger but looks at least 15 years younger.  However she is powered by a single Volvo diesel.  Speaking personally, I'd be reluctant to leave the rivers on a single engine cruiser because if the engine fails you're in big trouble.

Unfortunately with the Fairline we didn't get to go inside as the man had disappeared, however we did get to look inside another Mirage 29 at a different yard.  It was in similar nick externally, and very nice internally, but powered by twin petrol engines so a no no.  However that yard is getting another Mirage 29 in soon, with twin diesels (type unknown).  They'll be contacting me when they get it.

At this stage I cannot help leaning towards the Fairlines as they are in much better nick and slightly shorter.  However I'd really like to know how easy / cheap it would actually be to get the many minor cosmetic issues sorted out on the Princess but I guess no-one here can really help on that without seeing it.  I am kicking myself for not having taken photos of the areas of concern.

Ref boats from elsewhere - I am certainly looking at that.  However I would not consider buying a boat I had not examined closely in person so I am limited my search to boats stationed in and area Kent, Essex and Norfolk / Suffolk as anywhere else is too far to travel.

Simon

Australia Travel Site

Antares_9
Apr-25-2006 @ 10:59 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Been Posting For a Long Time
Posts: 1753
Joined: Jan 2006
Antares_9
          

Add To Ignore List
"I'd be reluctant to leave the rivers on a single engine cruiser because if the engine fails you're in big trouble."

Don't worry about a single engine for sea work, many seagoing boats both leasure & commercial, including trawlers (& our boat for that matter)are single engined. The important thing is that the powrer train is reliable, and by the power train I mean everything from the fuel tank to the prop.

The speed of the Prinnie need not be a concern either, planing boats of that size will need to reduce speed in any kind of a sea anyway and it will give you more of an incentive to plan your trips using the tides to your advantage instead of just "point & squirt". I have always apart from one had fast boats and the ability to run for cover is always a comfort but it is no substitute for planning and I am now quite happy to cruise at 12 - 17 kts if I have to, speed is costly and it's not the be all & end all (I can't believe I just wrote that)truth is either boat has its advantage but the most important piece of advice is GET A SURVEY, your insurer is almost certainly going to insist on one for a boat of that age anyway.

Good luck with your continuing search and I wish you many happy & safe hours afloat whatever your choice.

David


MMM, by the simple process of posting enough rubbish it seems I now "Know my stuff", bit like a PHD, enough pages and it's yours (in the absence of an emoicon, please assume tounge in cheek)

This message was edited by Antares_9 on Apr-25-06 @ 10:08 AM

ELYSIANBOATS
Apr-25-2006 @ 11:40 AM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 231
Joined: Apr 2006
ELYSIANBOATS
          

Add To Ignore List
If you want to enjoy the Broads in full glory...
the following should be on your short list.
1. Diesel engine - non turbo
2. Shaft driven - avoid outdrives
3. Air-draft that will fold/convert to 7ft or less
4. Pump out toilet
5. Boat Safety Certificate - will save time and money.

Put these on your shortlist if you want a 'perfect' broads cruiser. (p.s the Princess 32 is just a 'streched Elysian 27' Appleyard Lincoln + Co who designed and built the Elysian 27 had a parent company )shipping and Industrial Holdings who started up Senior Marine, an Elysian 27 mould tool was used, cut and stretched by 4 feet and modified for out drive installations, the Senior 31 was born. This was used as the RLM 31 and Marine Projects 31 (marketed as a 32 for princess)

elysianboats.co.uk

3164du
Apr-25-2006 @ 1:18 PM                           Permalink
reply
edit
profile
send p.m.
Forum Regular
Posts: 176
Joined: Nov 2005
          

Add To Ignore List
Ah two of my favourite boats, the Fairline Mirage and the Princess 32. You mention a twin Diesel Mirage coming soon, these are very rare, most are single Diesels or twin petrols.

I do think that with the Princess you are paying a bit extra for the name, have you considered a Senior 31 or Project 31?? Bothare the predecessors of the Princess 32 and the Projects can often be found with twin Diesels for £16/£18k, wheres as a really nice Princess 32 will cost you £22/£25k and the equivalent Mirage neare £30k.

I must agree though, the Mirage is the best looking boat, looking more like it was built in the mid-nineties than the late 70's/early 80's.

Have a look on www.jonesboatyard.co.uk they have a really nice Mirage ('Autumn Lady') for sale at the moment. Although its twin petrols.

Have you considered an Ocean 30, as most of those come with twin Mercedes diesels and can be had for £28k/£30k??

Or a Freeman 27??

Tell us how you get on.........

Tom

PAGE: 1 2

Home Photo Gallery Days Afloat Contact Us
Chat Room Downloads Norfolk Broads @ Amazon Make My Logo
Shops & Businesses Members Gear Norfolk Broads @ EBay Holiday Calendar
Pub Guide Tide Tables SOS List Popular Threads
2017 Calendar Contest Make A Donation Links Hireboat Info
Norfolk Broads @ CafePress FAQ Broads Quiz Forum Events
Advertise With Us Forum Shop Boating Bits Stickys and FAQs Boating Bits Hirecraft List

 

 

 



Copyright © 2005 Y2KInternet, All Rights Reserved.