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The Norfolk Broads Forum / Broads Boat Owners Q & A / Avoiding condensation
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Avoiding condensation

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FireDave
Nov-06-2017 @ 3:51 PM                           Permalink
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Hi everyone, I am about to embark on a large project on my boat...
The word boaters both love and loathe 'refurbishment'.

Walls are coming down and moving about, a stove is going in and, generally, I'm bringing her up to a comfortable modern living standard.

I'm going to replace the headlining thats in place- the white, leathery, the sponged type, with some wood. Now, I've seen this done with pine, which is good for costing but I want a light white roof to maximise light reflection inside. I'll be installing spot lights too.

Am I right in thinking that varnished wood will collect condensation, particularly in Winter? How about painted wood? Have you had any experience of what does/doesn't work?

For the kitchen too, have you installed a varnished or unvarnished oak/beech etc worktop? What're your experiences?

Any advice appreciated as I draw my plans! lol!

Thanks!

annville
Nov-06-2017 @ 5:27 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Dave I have varnished wood panels and have never had condensation on the wood, windows yes,i also have sprayed foam insulation all over on boat outer skin then oak panelling with flush l e d lights on top,boat is easy to heat with no condensation problems except the windows that aren't double glazed, usually when cooking veg etc, our work surface is Coran it also doesn't have condensation problems I would suggest that you use I C I interior varnish it's dear but gave us excellent results, we used the egg shell one, messy to paint the over head parts but result is worth it.We also have solar vents that circulate the air. only during  day light of course, we do have a rechargeable one over the cooking area for when cooking when dark.Ventilation and no cold surfaces is the way to go,the hull can still have condensation on boat skin out of site if not insulated behind the panels this will then run down into bilges or onto, into what ever blocks its path causing stains,mold,smell etc hope this helps .John

PCL023
Nov-06-2017 @ 5:32 PM                           Permalink
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The best I have found with no dew point is the bubble rap with foil either side, between the outer skin and panels. Also good in the summer keeping the heat out .

Cheers

Paul

annville
Nov-06-2017 @ 5:39 PM                           Permalink
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I forgot to add i used 3mm light oak ply panels it's easy to bend to curvature of roof and walls but still firm to the touch and it cuts easily with stanley knife or tenon saw and gives a light airy feel.John

FireDave
Nov-09-2017 @ 5:38 PM                           Permalink
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Thanks for the advice there!

I think the main way of getting around any condensation problems will be by double glazing the boat. I wonder if anyone has done this on here, and if they went for anosdised or powder coated frames?

Anodised are better right? I just think the silver, or gold frames on them don't look as 'warm' as pleasing as the powder coated. I wanted white frames, but you can only get them PC not anodised from the companies I've looked at.

Ooh, I'll have a look at those ICI paints now Smile

annville
Nov-10-2017 @ 10:43 AM                           Permalink
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Hi Dave Double glazing will work ok for the glass but the frames will still get condensation on them, also a boat flexes this can break the seal on the glass then window then goes milky they inject nitrogen on house double glazing to stop this but houses don't flex.Alternatively you can use acrylic sheets of plastic attached by velcro tape to the frames this enables you to detach for cleaning and stops the frame from getting wet,have found this works very well lot less work and cheaper to instal than double glazed windows and hardly noticeable as tape follows the frame contour.John

Stick
Nov-10-2017 @ 10:49 AM                           Permalink
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When I fitted mine out, I glassed battening into the inner hull in vertical stripes with cuts half way through on the outer face so I could " bend" it round the curvature of the hull. Then I used bubble wrap with tin foil coating ( was after as much radar signature I could get from a small hull, at sea) this I glued on with vertical strips of evo stick painted on but not covering entire area. You will always get condensation forming on the hull regardless of how much insulation you have so leaving verticals strips of bubble wrap not glued will help direct any condensation down behind the bubble wrap and into the bilge. Next I used recycled plastic bottle insulation, that was on special offer from B&Q at the time, again glued on in vertical strips.... If you don't glue it it eventually vibrates down the hull into a compressed lump in the bilge! Then I panelled all internal surfaces with thin ply then carpeted over that. Ceiling is same construction of bubble wrap and recycled plastic bottle insulation but no thin ply or carpet, for this I used tongue and groove light coloured pine. Recycled plastic bottles insulation has been treated at manufacture with flame retardant solution a d because it's plastic it naturally repellent water and of course it doesn't itch like glass wool insulation. Wheel house being mainly straight sides was battened between the oak frames then lined with tinfoil bubble wrap then flame retardant polystyrene then varnished tongue and groove. Only condensation I have is on my Windows. In winter with woodburner lit I have found I have to spray a fine mist of water over the tongue and groove ceiling in fore cabin as the stove drys the air so much the panels shrink! With hindsight I should have used thicker T&G but finances were tight so I used the budget packs. Thicker wood may have been more resistant to shrinkage. When I say I don't get condensation, I don't on walls or coverings but I do still get it on hull below waterline behind the insulation but it all runs with no obstruction into forward bilge. Wheel house wood can get condensation on it if I'm cooking vegetables or pasta even with the vents and extractor fan on but I just wipe them down with a sponge. Hope this is a help... Good luck with the returb enjoy it!

Ex-military! Not a civilian!

Simo
Nov-11-2017 @ 9:40 PM                           Permalink
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Ali frames will always get condensation on them, regardless if they are silver or powder coated!  Some household ali frames  incorparate a thermal break in them which seperates the inner and outer frame with a thermal barrier bonded inbetween, sounds good but still allows some condensation to form. Upvc frames would be more effecient but have a lot wider profile.

Simo

annville
Nov-12-2017 @ 6:32 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Dave Are you going to live on the boat you mention a good living standard? If you are going to have a stove/wood burner having a t/g ceiling in wood needs planning as the flue going through will get very hot,you need a minimum of 1kw of heat for every 14 cubic metres of space to bring it up to 20*c in winter.You mentian double glazing this will be expensive if having new windows often the opening part won't be double glazed.Or you could stick with a hot air heating which is the next best to reduce condensation along with insulation and ventilation. And cover the inside of windows with a sheet of acrylic making your own double glazing.John

FireDave
Nov-17-2017 @ 4:19 PM                           Permalink
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Great advice there. I went to B&Q last night to look at the bubble wrap foil. I guess I'll only be able to put it in certain areas initially- like the saloon and galley when I rip out the kitchen and install a new worktop. How much of a job is glassing in batons?
As I'll only be working in certain areas, is it possible to seal the wrap to the fibreglass hull directly? Without the need to put batons in? If I seal it in strips this would allow a little sag inbetween to direct the water down to the bilges right?


Another question to if I may. Last night when I turned my Webasco heating on I heard a repeated clicking sound coming from a small motor next to the fuel filter. Approx. 2 clicks a second. I switched it off and it stopped, but, that means no heating until I get my log fire in. I'm spending 2-3 nights on her a week at the min and last night was cold! Any ideas how to rectify? Is it a simple solution?


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