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The Norfolk Broads Forum / Broads Boat Owners Q & A / Battery Charging
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Battery Charging

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jimfin
Jan-22-2014 @ 10:50 AM                           Permalink
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I plan to fit 2 x 110amp domestic batteries. I also have an 85anp engine starter bat.
I think the alt on my BMC 1.8 diesel is only a 50 amp
Will this charge these batteries or do I need to get a bigger 70amp one. .
Thanks for any advice.



Just spotted to other post on the same subject. Sorry I posted this.

This message was edited by jimfin on Jan-22-14 @ 9:55 AM

rustic
Jan-22-2014 @ 11:20 AM                           Permalink
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It all depends on what you have on board that uses 12 volts.
Fridge, TV, inverter, standard bulbs or LEDs etc. How many hours a day you intend to cruise, and also how many days  you are likely to stay in one place consuming power.
Do you have electric hook up and a possible charger etc.?

So no one can answer your question, but most would say go for the biggest charge rate as you can get, but without a few calculations, even that might not be adequate, it depends...

Never allow the batteries to drop below 50% of charge, if you want a long life out of them.

Also as mentioned before, the alternator might be rated at 50 amps, but not all that will be available to charge the batteries, it depends on battery management, and what revs the engine has to be to provide maximum output.

Hope it helps, a bit of back to the drawing board, but some more information will help.




best regards, Richard.
I can't wait to be back on the Broads.

650XS
Jan-22-2014 @ 11:42 AM                           Permalink
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above vise good ...........

take a pic orf top orf engine showing alternator and any relays near the batts etc as yer migth have a spitter orf sorts and then we migth get a chance to see what yer charge set up can handle


norm bmc 1.8 had ole acr or or 11ac, both intoday standard bit low on output etc but can handle a bit

but not always just as some most popular


we could got into chapter and verse but simple like me is a bit better

as russsy say list yer goodies on board etc .....


look forward to help if we can ..............


good hunting ..............

www.wayfordmarineservices.com

big mouth, large heart and gut
too....

try tell it how it is .....

mod that...........!!!!

Jeremy-Aslan
Jan-22-2014 @ 12:27 PM                           Permalink
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The most important question is :  'Do you have an electric fridge?'
A secondary question might be - 'Do you cruise much during the of-season when there are long dark evenings and you use the lights a lot?'
But mostly, it's an electric fridge which uses more power than just about everything else (unless you have lots of fancy toys on board  -  but I suspect you don't, or you'd already have battery problems).
Broadly, even from a 50 Amp alternator, if you cruise for a couple of hours, you should put most of the charge back in to a pair of 110Ah domestics which had been taken down to 50%.

I have an electric fridge and just one 110Ah battery, which copes most of the time.

I'd probably recommend fitting the batteries (I'm assuming you are replacing an existing, single, domestic battery), and seeing how you get on with your present alternator.  If after using it for part or all of a season, and you think it needs beefing up a bit, that should be possible then.  If you are OK with your present one, you've saved some cash.


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jimfin
Jan-22-2014 @ 1:03 PM                           Permalink
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Thanks for all the replies.
The alt is a Rover 65amp. I have a Waeco Coolmatic fridge which is rated at about 45w.
We cruise for about 3 hours a day. So the fridge could run for 15-18 hours before we move. But there are occasions when we will not move for a day or so.
Was talking to an auto electrician and he said to look for a lucas 110amp fitted to tractors. What do you think!!!

Grendel
Jan-22-2014 @ 1:29 PM                           Permalink
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well assuming a fully charged battery at 45W your fridge will draw just under 4Amps, assuming you only take your battery to 50% capacity 2x110Ah batteries will give you approximately 27 hours of fridge running.
your 65A alternator should in theory fully recharge 110Ah in about an hour and a three quarters (half the battery capacity),that of course assumes you get the full power from the alternator at your engine running speed, one assumes a tractor alternator is designed for a low revving engine so that may be a good option, generally the starter battery should be topped back up after about half an hour of cruising, note this is based on only using half the capacity of your batteries (recommended to keep your batteries healthy) and just based upon the fridges consumption (no other lights or power use.
Grendel

we do the impossible every day,
miracles take a little longer

rustic
Jan-22-2014 @ 2:58 PM                           Permalink
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A fridge rated at 45 watts, will be when it's on. They don't run 100% of the time, depending on the air temperature, required fridge temperature, it might only be on 50% during the day, and maybe only 25% during the night.
Thus increasing the time between battery charges.
Of course, 50% or 25% is only an example, you would need to test run your fridge with various ambient temperatures, preferred interior temperatures etc etc.
This will then give you an average consumption.




best regards, Richard.
I can't wait to be back on the Broads.

Jeremy-Aslan
Jan-22-2014 @ 3:53 PM                           Permalink
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Hmmm . . .  45 W sounds high so I had a peek at the Waeko website for the CR65 (a typical sized boat fridge) where it does seem to say :
Average Power Consumption      Approx. 45 watts

But then, it also says:
Current Consumption (12 volts DC):      1.6  Ah/h at +25°C ambient temperature  (and a few other things, but let's calculate from that).  This seems to indicate that at 25 deg C it runs for about one third of the time.

Put it another way, you've got about 100 Ah from your two batteries (allowing for some use by lighting, etc, and taking them down to 50% capacity).  That would give you about 60 hours fridge power on a hot summer's day, even assuming the temperature stays that warm through the night(!).  That might (just) be three nights (two whole days) in one place, without needing to run the engine.

If you then cruise for three hours, you should easily put that charge back in with a 65A alternator.  But your limit is battery bank capacity, not alternator size.   So, with your additional information, I would still say  -  stick with your present alternator, unless it subsequently proves to be inadequate.



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jimfin
Jan-22-2014 @ 4:09 PM                           Permalink
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Thanks for that. I was thinking of fitting a Stering Power Advanced Regulator to help things.
What would you think?

Jeremy-Aslan
Jan-22-2014 @ 4:34 PM                           Permalink
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The Sterling units can be great, sometimes you need a higher voltage out of your alternator (to cope with the small drop in the electronics).  Some alternators have a setting for a higher output, many don't.

You may need a marine electronics expert to actually look at your system to determine what is suitable in your situation.  Many Sterling units can also provide fully regulated charging and top-up from shore-power as well.  By using a specific charging regime, it is possible that your battery life might be extended.

Maybe you want to 'sort out' all your electrics in one hit, which I can fully understand; but I would probably put in the two new batteries and see if you had any problems, before adding an extra item.  If you make loads of changes at once, and you then have a problem of some kind, it is not so clear what might have caused it.

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annville
Jan-22-2014 @ 5:07 PM                           Permalink
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You can have as many battery's large or small no alternator charges what its rated at you need a advanced charging regulator this is wired to rear of alternator and fools the alternator into charging max untill battery is fully charged ie 50amp alt ~2X200amp batt=400amps = 8hrs MIN This is only theoretical a normal alternator will never charge the batterys fully and take 4 times as long If you go on the Sterling web site it will describe this in detail.A battery is a reservoir ie 100amps will run a bulb of 10amps/120watts for less then 8hrs in practice 10hrs [theoreticle] The size of a alternator determines how fast you replace the amps it has nothing to do with how many items you run of the batterys or how much power they take. A 100 amp alternator wont charge the batterys twice as fast as a 50amp one unless you use a advanced charging regulator John  

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