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The Norfolk Broads Forum / General Chat / Owning a boat on the Broads
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Owning a boat on the Broads

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MrWeetabix
May-24-2016 @ 7:58 AM                           Permalink
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Hi all. Apart from the freedom of being on the water anytime you choose, what are the advantages of owning a boat as apposed to hiring?
Also if you are not flushed for money, can you still afford one or share buy one, or are there deals to own a boat?
Say a 3/4 birth boat.
Sorry, I know it's a lot of questions, but I've been hiring many times on the Broads and I absolutely love it every time. Just wanting to know if it is a better option in the long run to buy.
Thanks.

Mr Weetabix
Life is but a moment in time. Enjoy
yourself on the Rivers

Steve51
May-24-2016 @ 8:21 AM                           Permalink
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quote:"......
Apart from the freedom of being on the water anytime you choose......."


You've just answered your own question.  Smile

There are a couple of syndicates on the Broads where you buy a share in a boat and get a number of weeks each year to use the boat.

If you want the "any time you choose" option, then ownership is the only way to go. You can get on the water with something reasonable for as little as say, £10000. Allow a couple of thousand a year for mooring, toll and insurance and you have the absolute freedom to enjoy this wonderful place whenever you like.

You will also need to keep in mind that boats will always throw up the occasional unexpected expense, but it really is worth it.

Steve. CM1 and NR12

CaptBryan
May-24-2016 @ 9:42 AM                           Permalink
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You have to ask yourself. "Truthfully how often can I use this boat"?
This will depend on:
Retired or still working
Family commitments
Where you live
Etc.
Boats very rarely stack up financially, it is a bit of a "heart and head battle"

Captain Howe.

The Eagle may soar majestic,
but you don't suck a Stoat
into your jet engines.
Please leave the water and
banks as you would wish to
find them.

ranworthbreeze
May-24-2016 @ 10:11 AM                           Permalink
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There is at least eight syndicate boats on the Norfolk Broads and there are a number of boats that are shared by crews.

As has already been said that if you have pockets full of money, your partner also loves boating or you do not work    or are semi retired then to purchase a boat is the best option.

If time is limited then being part of a syndicate is IMHO the best option, we are due to have our 33rd visit to the Broads in early July. Tan & I have never regretted our purchase of our share in Ranworth Breeze in 2001.

If you want advice on Syndicate Boat shares by all means contact me.

We currently do not have any shares for sale, but I do know what is available on some of the other syndicates.

Regards
Alan

Alan Hood
Chairman & Trustee
Ranworth Breeze Boat Syndicate




This message was edited by ranworthbreeze on May-24-16 @ 10:12 AM

Paladine
May-24-2016 @ 10:15 AM                           Permalink
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Boating is like any other not-for-profit hobby. You put money in and you get enjoyment out.

Unless you are quite wealthy, you need to sit down and work out whether the money you will undoubtedly spend is worth it for the enjoyment you will get. Only you can decide that.

Some questions you need to ask yourself (and give yourself realistic answers to);

How easy will it be to get from where you live to where you will moor your boat?

Will the time/length of that journey be a deterrent to using the boat?

How often can you sensibly expect to use the boat? (I am retired, live four minutes drive from my mooring, but can only get out for about 6 or seven weeks a year, because boating is not my only, or prime, hobby.)

What are your budgets - for the initial purchase and the running costs?

It's important to make a rational decision on whether boat purchase is the right choice for you, before you even think about what type of boat to buy.

There have been several threads on the forum on this subject over the years. Unfortunately, the site's search facility has a bit of a glitch and won't return major historic search results, but you might like to browse through these https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fthe-norfolk-broads.co.uk+buying+a+boat&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gfe_rd=cr&ei=TRpEV-CcLePR8gebi4fgBQ

"..for the avoidance of any doubt, the broads are not legally a national park and do not come under the national park legislation, and nor will they."
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for DEFRA (Hansard 2015)

Uncle_Nobby
May-24-2016 @ 10:57 AM                           Permalink
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A good question Mr Weetabix.  

Boating is expensive.  No question.  It's a hobby, pastime, passion, whatever you want to call it.  Very few are the people who can buy a boat, moor it, maintain it and not notice the cost.  The more cash you have, the bigger the boat and the bigger the costs (usually).

As mentioned already, how far away are you?  Will your weekend visit end up in washing/painting/varnishing it instead of going out and about?  

I enjoy faffing and tinkering almost as much as going out but then I live five minutes away from my mooring and am in a position to be able to go whenever I want to.  

When I bought my first boat, I had plans to keep her for a few years and then to upgrade.  Actually, I upgraded within the first few months, and then did the same again.  And again.

Try it.  Try a boat which is not too expensive to see whether being an owner works for you.  If it doesn't, you can sell and recoup most of your costs.  If it does, you can upgrade again and again.




MisterB
May-24-2016 @ 11:55 AM                           Permalink
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ive just bought my first boat and put it on the broads. I didn't intend spending as much money on the boat but i am pretty certain i will get most of my money back on the investment so far, which was important to me, when i went through the same exercise you are going through. i didn't want to share and then have only part enjoyment, but i can see the benefits. as has been pointed out, its a hobby and hobbies cost money. how much you invest should be proportional to how much you 'do' your hobby.
perhaps a simple spreadsheet identifying likely amount of time spent against cost will give an indication of whether you should buy, part buy or rent for just the time you spend?

Steve51
May-24-2016 @ 12:05 PM                           Permalink
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Previous posts just go to prove how we all use our boats differently.

Unlike Paladine I only retired last week and I live 100 miles from the boat, yet last year I spent over 100 days on the boat. I probably spent more on diesel in the car than I did on diesel in the boat!

Steve. CM1 and NR12

annville
May-24-2016 @ 1:08 PM                           Permalink
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Mr Weetabix NONE AT ALL unless you use it more than three/four weeks a year. John

Chris709D
May-24-2016 @ 1:22 PM                           Permalink
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We used to hire 2 or 3 times a year costing around £2,500.

We bought our first boat last year and spend about the same (£2,500) on mooring, toll, insurance etc a year.

Obviously with a hire boat at the end of the week you hand it back and forget about it. With your own boat its on going! Engine services, anti fouling, repairs etc.

Boating is not cheap, but if you live local and use it for days out, weekends away and several week long holidays a year I don't think its too bad!

Chris  





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