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The Norfolk Broads Forum / General Chat / Breydon Water
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Breydon Water

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Captain-Joshie
May-09-2005 @ 4:24 PM                           Permalink
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Hi All

Can anyone answer my question?
If the best time to cross Breydon Water is on low water slack, why can't the same be true about crossing on high water slack.
I know that on low water slack it's actually best about an hour after the low water slack so would this work the other way round ie. one hour before high water slack. Just one of those idle question that spring up from time to time.
By the way many thanks to Paul for the excellent tide table producer on the Shorebase Site, I'd be lost without them.


Kind regards, John & Jo.

Denise
May-09-2005 @ 4:40 PM                           Permalink
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I think the 'low water' bit is so you can get through the Great Yarmouth bridges.

The 'hour after slack' bit - that's when the tide starts to flow in. So you then get the benefit of the flow tide taking you upriver.


Boatboy
May-09-2005 @ 4:49 PM                           Permalink
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Hello both, first of all welcome to the forum, it's always nice to see new members posting.

Three reasons why slack low water is best

Slack water, when no tide is running is the easist time to manouver your boat, so in the narrow channel through Great Yarmouth it's much easier to keep the front of the boat pointing where you want it to go.

Second the heigt of the bridges is a concern. There are two bridges near to the mouth of the river bure which have about 7 feet clearance at high water, but if the tide is particularly high it can be less.

Third is the effect on fuel consumption. If you head down to Great Yarmouth on the last of the outgoing tide and then head upriver on the start of the incoming tide you can halve the amount of fuel you use. This is especially tru going south to north.

My preference is to aim for slack water (about half an hour after low tide) when going north to south and half an hour or so later going south to north. When the tide turns at the mouth of the Bure the river tends to flow out for another half hour or so, the water going into Breydon.

Paul

So ends the lesson according to the Boatster.

billmaxted
May-09-2005 @ 4:56 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Guys Denise has it in one, you need low water to get under the bridges especially if coming from the southern broads. Bear also in mind the that the Northern and Southern rivers do not 'turn' at the same time see Hamilton's guide for fuller details. Go too early and you catch up with the ebb and going through Reedham is a misery.

Hey, Sir is this your son you've left behind! Bill...

Richard
May-09-2005 @ 5:05 PM                           Permalink
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Is there a hydrologist who can explan why the difference in the flood/ebb times between the northern and southern rivers. I assumed it was something to do with the volume of water, but just a S.W.A.G.

Boatboy
May-09-2005 @ 5:11 PM                           Permalink
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It's all to do with the volume of water and the size of the channel in Gt Yarmouth. Water backs up upstream on the northern rivers but the wider passage from the southern rivers allows water to flow out more easily.

When the tide turns at the mouth of the bure that river tends to flow out for an extra 30 - 45 minutes whilst the Yare and Breydon water have already turned and started to flow in.

Hope this makes sense!

So ends the lesson according to the Boatster.

Boatboy
May-09-2005 @ 5:27 PM                           Permalink
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Another point to remember is that when you turn the corner, if you got your timings right you will still be going with the tide. It's no good opening the throttle as far as it will go as you will only catch up with the outgoing tide, and as Bill says, do that at Reedham, or at Acle and you'll notice the change in effort needed to move forward

Paul
May-09-2005 @ 5:42 PM                           Permalink
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I'll add one more layer of complication to the answer..

It's best explained in "Hamilton's Navigations", an excellent guide to the Broads, that has been around for decades.

He gave a very comprehensive explanation of the tidal influence on the Broads, and mentions the "salt water wedge" effect.

The current still runs out past Yarmouth Yacht Station for a 1 - 1½ hours after the water level has started to rise. The 'salt water wedge' current runs in underneath, while freshwater ebb current still runs out on top. So 'slack water' though safer with no current, does not give the highest clearance under the bridges.

Thanks for the compliment on the tide calc. I'm just about to recalculate the base data (Gorleston Bar), for the next 5 years, so that it will give predictions for any date up to 2010...   Smile

BarnacleBill
May-09-2005 @ 6:46 PM                           Permalink
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It's a quite complex example of what's known in engineering circles as a dynamic material balance.

I find it helps to think of a bath, with the taps at the opposite end to the plughole.  Someone is running the bath but has forgotten to put the plug in.  

Nevertheless, they are big old taps and water is coming out of them at a faster rate than it can get down the plug'ole.  So, although the current is flowing downhill (from the taps and down the plug), the water level is rising...

Does this help?  No, thought not... but then, not everyone's as thick as me and needs it explaining like this!

PizzaLover
May-09-2005 @ 7:13 PM                           Permalink
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... but none of this has anything to do with the "Coriolis Effect" - which is something totally different.


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