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Posted By Discussion Topic: Boat Yard practices

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MandA
Nov-25-2021 @ 11:26 AM                           Permalink
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I would totally agree with spiderman be very cautious about going down a major refit unless you have loads of spare time  and plenty of money,also keep in mind what the boat would be worth in the end,
On the other hand you might well enjoy the experience and be very proud of your achievements in the end,
Good luck.
Adrian.




MandA

L'sBelles
Nov-25-2021 @ 3:59 PM                           Permalink
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Another vote for 'carefully consider' what you are getting into regarding refitting.
We have had our boat for 18 months and apart from an hour down the river and back again every blue moon we have not used her yet!
What with the ever increasing number of jobs to do because in attempting to remedy one fault you find two others, lockdowns, lack of fuel to be able to travel, the wife having surgery, my favourite dog having to be put to sleep, and the "to do" list is still as long as it was in the first week of ownership it is a challenge that we were not expecting.
Having said that, there is satisfaction in making a good repair and we know that by the time we reach the end of that list we shall have a boat we are proud of that will last many years to come.
I don't wish to disuade you from taking on the project and since you appear to be competent in providing your own labour it shall only be materials that cost you money and you can buy those as and when you need them spreading the cost.

Strowager
Nov-25-2021 @ 5:06 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Alan.

I've just read carefully through your thread and IMHO your most urgent task is to try and reduce the stress level and anguish it has caused you and Gemma.

Easier said than done, I know, but life is too short to dwell on mistakes if that prolongs the pain.

I haven't posted anything on this forum for over ten years, but your distress has prompted me to make this response.

There's been a lot of well informed advice here on legal claim procedure and technical thoughts on remedial action for your boat, outlining the two potential paths forward.

I have to admit, if it were me, I would choose the DIY rebuild option, partly because I've done that sort of work on my own boats, and partly because I would be too wary of losing more money on what could easily be a completely lost cause legally. Also, seeing your own skill and handiwork gradually overcoming the faults would help you and Gemma emotionally.

So in an attempt to try to focus on the positives of you purchase, your hull is fibreglass, rather than wood, so the remedial work is all internal, so requiring much simpler DIY skills than planking and conventional hull ribs.  As you'e surmised, the project is indeed extensive, potentially requiring a complete strip out of the interior fittings and floor, including most of the plumbing and electrics, though at least the engine, geabox, propshaft and steering gear should be able to remain in-situ.

You've mentioned that you have experience of house rebuilds, including services and even moving walls, so a 43ft glassfibre hull should be well within your range.

Fifteen years ago, I restored a 40 year old Hampton Safari over a period of 2 months in one of Martham Boat Dev's dry sheds.  That had some rotten stringers and "weetabix" rot to the bottom of some of the wooden bulkheads, but everything was easily fixed with exterior grade plywood that I also pre coated in epoxy resin before bonding it back to the hull to prevent any future re-occurence.

Compared to the neighbouring boat "projects" in that shed, the amount of work and the cost of the materials was much less than the wooden planked boats, which required extensive woodworking skills, just to maintain their watertight integrity, let alone any cosmetic niceties.  Refitting a 40 year old fibreglass "tub" of half inch thick inert fibreglass gave a much more substantial foundation to work on compared to all those complex three dimensional wooden works of art that are made out of (very) bio-degradeable material !

As someone has already mentioned, boatyards with DIY lift out space are pretty full up over the Winter lay up period, but if you can find a yard that has rentable space and suitable "tender" boat lifting equipment rather than simple slings, and preferable inside, your project is eminently practical for someone with the extensive DIY practical experience you have had.  It will take several months, but I doubt if the cost of materials would be prohibitive, since it would be exterior ply and internal "home" products from places like B&Q, rather than Chandlers.

Also, as someone else has already mentioned as well, don't be too disappointed at finding such poor quality construction under the floor, those "Carribean" style craft from the 70's even often had chipboard and other such cheapo materials in out of sight areas. Once you replace all the cr*p with good quality exterior ply and epoxy resin, you will ensure any future resale value, especially if you take plenty of photos during the rebuild.




This message was edited by Strowager on Nov-25-21 @ 5:24 PM


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JollyRodger
Nov-25-2021 @ 5:21 PM                           Permalink
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Re refitting, just a small point, a boat is not a house. Good Broads boats have been ruined by carpenters and house builders who have moved or even removed 'wall's in order to create space. In general 'walls' are where they are as an integral part of the structure. On top of that unsuitable materials have been used. MDF, for example does not perform well in a damp, marine environment. There is a large, Brooke built, motorised houseboat on the Broads, she was taken on by a housebuilder who did hundreds of hours of work refitting her, all to no avail. Housebuilders don't tend to make good boat builders! There was a large boat that had been 'open planned' and had a quality, internal refit whilst she was still afloat, the owner was well pleased. Problem was that he'd taken out structurally critical bits and when she was lifted out of the water she sagged and the engine and doors all went out of alignment. The moral of the story is simple, ask for and listen to good advice.

Jolly Roger

aledsav1
Nov-25-2021 @ 6:12 PM                           Permalink
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Strowager, thank you very much for you input, given the time you have not posted for. I like the positive attitude for doing the work, I am/was wobbling a little due to focusing on all the negatives of taking this on.

I spoke to a yards boat builder last week who on hearing the situ just said, 'oh so with your existing skills shouldn't be a problem and the initial materials just to deal with the stringers wouldn't be to expensive'.

I find these conducive to my usual attitude of 'can do' but as this is not my area and it is not a house on dry land, the doubts easily creep in and take over.

JR, yes I would be as I go along seeking guidance.  There is already a bulkhead missing that was probably taken out many many years ago, and although I do not want to put that back as it would alter the layout to something we don't want, I would be addressing the missing bulkhead, even though it has survived without it.




alan

This message was edited by aledsav1 on Nov-25-21 @ 6:16 PM

Dilligaf
Nov-25-2021 @ 6:19 PM                           Permalink
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Been there with rotten bits, this was the state of the engine bearers under the grp of my old RLM31.

https://normanboats.net/leomagill/pugs/SS850543.JPG

Ended up like this.
https://normanboats.net/leomagill/pugs/SS850612.JPG

Dave.
Formerly 'LeoMagill'


This message was edited by Dilligaf on Nov-25-21 @ 6:25 PM

aledsav1
Nov-25-2021 @ 6:24 PM                           Permalink
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can't see that image inputting that link into google?

alan

ignore can now!

This message was edited by aledsav1 on Nov-25-21 @ 6:24 PM

Dilligaf
Nov-25-2021 @ 6:27 PM                           Permalink
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Previous post edited, been trying to insert pics rather than linking but messed up.


Dave.
Formerly 'LeoMagill'

Japonica
Nov-25-2021 @ 6:36 PM                           Permalink
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Hi all,
Sorry to hear of your experiences Alan, I really do sympathise with you.
Too late now but anyone thinking of buying an old ex hire cruiser I’d seriously suggest you get a survey done.
We do lots of work on these and the build quality of some is appalling!
They may look nice with plush cushions, curtains and shiny cookers but the way many were throw together is quite worrying.
Removed the floor out of one and the best tool for the job was a shovel! Cheap faced chipboard plastered in polyester. The owners wanted to upgrade they galley and blew most of the budget having new floor bearers and floor done.

aledsav1
Nov-25-2021 @ 6:37 PM                           Permalink
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Good transformation

I shall at some point post some pics of what I have

alan

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