Topic: Diesel heaters


ADI    -- Sep-22-2020 @ 8:22 PM
  Which is better
1 outlet then split into 4 larger outlets or 4 outlets at a smaller diameter no splitting required?

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


This message was edited by ADI on Sep-22-20 @ 9:24 PM


ADI    -- Sep-22-2020 @ 8:29 PM
  4 outlet version

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


ruby    -- Sep-22-2020 @ 9:36 PM
  I don't claim to be an expert but I would go for the 4 tube version. I have two splitters on my boat and it is a nightmare trying to get the heat to balance between fore and aft.

One outlet is fierce and hot, the other three are gentle and warm.  I would prefer the other way round.

I think you have more chance of heating your whole boat with four tubes and no splitters .

Graham


Regulo    -- Sep-22-2020 @ 10:20 PM
  Another vote for the 4 separate outlets, Adi. The less restrictions to flow the better. Every junction will disrupt the air flow a little. But don't overlook the practicalities of running and insulating separate hoses the length of the boat. It might be more practical, depending on your proposed layout, to run larger hoses to a convenient split point. There's no hard and fast rule with these things.

Regards, Ray.

Whatever happens now, I'm blaming it on Brexit. Everyone else is!


ADI    -- Sep-24-2020 @ 7:46 PM
  I've just worked out the area of of the single outlet (A˜17671.46) and the 4 outlet version (A˜22167.08) there is a greater area with the 4 outlet version so should be less restriction for the heater.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


ncsl    -- Sep-25-2020 @ 8:12 AM
  If you use the 4 way heater then would suggest you make sure that at least one outlet can NOT be turned off.
Safety reasons.


I cruise on THE NORFOLK BROAD as I can not cruise on something that is NOT.

Official Photographer.
<a href=http://www.youtube.com/user/ncsl>Video</a>


Regulo    -- Sep-25-2020 @ 10:21 AM
 
quote:"......
I've just worked out the area of of the single outlet (A˜17671.46) and the 4 outlet version (A˜22167.08) there is a greater area with the 4 outlet version so should be less restriction for the heater.
......."


That might not tell the whole story, ADI. One large outlet cowl may possibly restrict the direct flow from the heater less than the 4 outlet version. The 4 outlet one puts a large lump of plastic directly in the centre of the outlet from the heater. Again, who knows until you try it? By which time, it's too late!!!  Wink

Regards, Ray.

Whatever happens now, I'm blaming it on Brexit. Everyone else is!


Steve51    -- Sep-25-2020 @ 1:13 PM
  Also worth noting is that resistance will be far greater through the smaller ducts than the larger one. The air volume will decrease significantly over a greater distance too. If you were running one of those small ones the full length of a boat, I doubt you'd get much out of the end.

I did a fair bit of work on ducted air systems during my working life, although it was on installation rather than design, so I can't claim to be an expert.

Steve. CM1 and NR12


annville    -- Sep-27-2020 @ 9:57 AM
  Hi I dont think that there is a best way it depends on how is the best way to distribute the air and if each outlet is fixed or adjustable if the first outlet on a run is opened than this will reduce the flow to the others many have a 4inch flow from heater the tee off this is fine if heater is say at one end of boat but if in middle you will want two runs at the end of the day the heater will only produce a given flow you then divide it between out lets it is better to have to bigger size then to little. John


ruby    -- Sep-27-2020 @ 12:26 PM
  Not meaning to hi jack the  thread but has anyone tried inserting an inline electric fan (ie computer cooling fan) into a length of heating ducting to improve the flow to distant outlets ?

Can't see any obvious problems other than the heat of the air in the ducting melting the fan if plastic.

Any thoughts would be appreciated and might also help the op.

Graham


annville    -- Sep-27-2020 @ 3:56 PM
  Hi Graham It my cause the heater to shut off if the pressure at the heater fell below sencer setting you will always get less at the end as you would the beginning as temp of air drops the density will lower.idealy you want a large volume at a slow speed then no noise or drafts. John


ruby    -- Sep-28-2020 @ 10:53 AM
  Thanks John

I hadn't thought of that . I will experiment with care .

I hope it won't be a problem. Basically my problem is one of Angles. It is an ex hire boat and the builder installed  the heater for simplicity rather than effectiveness. Six inches after the outlet I have a splitter. One bit goes straight  to the saloon and rear cabin vents which get all the heat and air which is actually more than enough. The other bit goes into a 180 curve and then to a 12 foot length of drain pipe to go through the engine bay and into the  forecabin at which point there is no force or heat. Basically the air is being asked to go back on itself.

Shutting off the saloon vent gives a marginal improvement but not really effective, hence my idea of putting a small fan somewhere along the 12 foot drainpipe run.

Thanks again

Graham



annville    -- Sep-28-2020 @ 5:23 PM
  On my last boat i wrapped armerflex around the air distribution pipes held in place by tye wraps, you can buy this in sheets or camping sleeping mats do simmerler but beware the cheap ones are not fire resistant. John


angelfish    -- Sep-28-2020 @ 7:56 PM
  Hi just rejoined after a while away.
If the splitter is a 'T' join and the straight way does not go directly to the cabin turn it round so it does. If it is a 'Y' joint try a 't' joint as above.
As has been suggested lagging the pipe with increase the flow of heat, JPC, Brundall do some good but pricey lagging.
All of the above are cheaper than a new heater and the new heater will benefit from lagging anyhow.
paul


ADI    -- Oct-4-2020 @ 7:40 PM
  Did a quick test of the new heater today, jump leads on the car lol, all working fine very pleased, not bad for £87.92 from Czech Republic delivered in 4 days.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


This message was edited by ADI on Oct-4-20 @ 8:43 PM


ADI    -- Oct-4-2020 @ 8:00 PM
  Anville would you recommend vaseline on the diesel heater electrical connections? infact all 12 volt electrical connections on the boat moving forward.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


annville    -- Oct-5-2020 @ 10:17 AM
  Hi Adi electrical contact grease ie petroleum grease/jelly is the same as vaseline vaseline is medically cleaned but easily obtained petroleum jelly or modern equivalent silicone grease is not in small quantities But if no silicone grease use vaseline does same job, and most people have it to hand.BUT DO NOT use ordinary grease on electrical components.  John


ADI    -- Oct-5-2020 @ 11:34 AM
  Thanks for that John, maybe I shouldn't have asked you if you recommend maybe I should have said do you use electrical lubrication on all connections?

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Regulo    -- Oct-5-2020 @ 11:55 AM
  ADI, please inspect that exhaust silencer for gas tightness. Take it off, cover one end and blow through the other, should not leak at the sides. It should be OK if it's for marine use. Similar shaped ones for automotive use are NOT gas sealed as they are designed to be fitted externally.
See here: http://the-norfolk-broads.co.uk/viewmessages.cfm?Forum=22&Topic=37743&keywords=exhaust

This message was edited by Regulo on Oct-5-20 @ 7:28 PM


ADI    -- Oct-5-2020 @ 7:29 PM
  Ray I can confirm it leaks like a sieve as on start up smoke was coming out of all the edges, I was thinking of soldering it with blow torch but not sure if it will take to the stainless (if that is what it is) or sealing it with Fire Mate Intumescent Acrylic Sealant with a u shaped channel slotted over the joint, either way I will make it safe and test it, having said that do I even have to use it could I just take the straight pipe to the skin fitting. I suppose a bit of sealant on all exhaust joints is required too.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Regulo    -- Oct-5-2020 @ 8:40 PM
  You can buy sealed marine units. I wouldn't take the risk of anything you do coming apart, leaving it leaking exhaust fumes into the boat. It's just not worth it. My original install just had the exhaust going straight through with no silencer. When I fitted the silencer, I really couldn't hear any difference. Probably quieter outside to the listening public!!

Regards, Ray.

Whatever happens now, I'm blaming it on Brexit. Everyone else is!


This message was edited by Regulo on Oct-5-20 @ 9:43 PM


annville    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 9:37 AM
  Hi Adi Yes i always use lubricant on connections, ref the heater just be aware the the silencer is also a condensation trap you will find a small hole in the bottom of silencer thats to let the water out otherwise as the exhaust pipe rises water could run back into the combustion chamber, at that price a very good deal what output is it? John


Regulo    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 11:32 AM
 
quote:"......
the silencer is also a condensation trap you will find a small hole in the bottom of silencer thats to let the water out otherwise as the exhaust pipe rises water could run back into the combustion chamber
......."


Is this right? Surely only on external silencers? You'll be leaking exhaust gas into the boat if that's fitted internally. Needs seriously looking into. It may be why the automotive ones aren't sealed, the openings allow for condensation draining?

Regards, Ray.

Whatever happens now, I'm blaming it on Brexit. Everyone else is!


This message was edited by Regulo on Oct-6-20 @ 12:34 PM


L'sBelles    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 2:32 PM
  When I thought I needed a diesel heater for our boat I spoke with a chap who reconditions Webasto and Eberspachers who appeared very knowledgable about the subject. He advised that heaters designed for use in road vehicles are not suitable for marine use and despite losing a sale he would not sell me one of the units he had in stock as in his opinion it was not suitable. The silencer is just one of the issues but there are others like units that are intended for road use have altitude compensation apparently. Cannot see much use for that if you are always at sea level! There may be other differences but cannot remember all of what he said off the top of my head. The OP may be able to cobble something together out of the bits he has but whether or not it is reliable or efficient I would not like to guess.


ADI    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 9:22 PM
  Is this the kind of silencer you have Ray? marine silencer thinking a straight pipe through might be best, less joints to seal.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


ADI    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 9:30 PM
  John I will have a close look at the silencer for a drain hole, its a 8kw heater.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


ADI    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 9:36 PM
  L'sBelles I know there really efficient but not sure about reliability but am hopeful.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Regulo    -- Oct-6-2020 @ 10:20 PM
  Yes, Adi, that's the one. I don't remember paying that much, but it did seem expensive at the time! To be honest, I'd fit it without a silencer, and see how it goes. It's not a great deal of trouble to fit one at a later date, if you deem it necessary. As I said, I really couldn't say it made much difference inside the boat. Probably quietens it down to the outside audience, but as I'm never out there when it's running - who cares?  Smile

Regards, Ray.


annville    -- Oct-7-2020 @ 9:54 AM
  Hi Often the difference with marine and road/caravan is the material that they are constructed from caravan cookers are a classic example caravan one's  steel that rusts or boat one's brass/stainless that doesn't, the silencers that are shown are round and i guess are road use,  boat one's that i have seen and the one on my last Eberspacher was/are square with a drain hole and made from heavy metal coated, and the through hull fitting, has a air/heat gap between the hull plate and the exhaust pipe to stop heat transfer to the hull,   the pipe is flexible stainless steel held on by a clamp to the heater, silencer and hull fitting, road vehicles wouldn't need this, as an aside they were invented during the last war by the Germans to heat there tanks whilst stationary to stop them freezing up in Russia, so been around a long time, then used on coaches and lorrys. John


ADI    -- Oct-7-2020 @ 7:24 PM
  I have to say I am a bit concerned about the exhaust set up and can see the idea of a drain pipe, I guess it needs to be well above the waterline too, would the drain off pipe go to the bilge?

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


BuffaloBill    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 7:42 AM
  When doing anything of this kind on your boat, ask
yourself how much is yours and your families lives
worth. It just isn't worth trying to do it on the cheap.
Just my opinion of course........

The older I get...
The better I was....!!


Steve51    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 7:52 AM
  ADI, I think there's a bit of misunderstanding going on here. Just connect the exhaust straight to the skin fitting and forget the silencer. As Ray says, they make little difference and any condensation forming in the exhaust on cool-down will be expelled in the form of steam when it starts up again.

As an aside, I'm pretty sure that the plastic fuel line supplied with the heater doesn't comply with the BSS.

Edited to add. Wise words from BB.
Steve. CM1 and NR12

This message was edited by Steve51 on Oct-8-20 @ 9:31 AM


L'sBelles    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 8:19 AM
  We have an Eberspacher fitted on our boat and the exhaust goes straight through the hull; no silencer. To be fair it is whisper quiet inside and outside but then it is only rated at 3.5 kW to warm the air in the boat we do not expect to cook our breakfast with it!


annville    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 11:05 AM
  Hi Adi The drain hole doesn't have a drain hose connection the small amount of water just drips where it falls then evaporates,  as to if you fit a silencer or not, if you dont i would allow provision to fit one at a later date in case you need to,  i would look up the fitting instruction for Webasto and Eberspacher and be guided by them as to a marine fit the instructions for your one that came with it were possible for a road/caravan fit and not suitable for marine use and pass the BSC, as to noise it may not be noisy during the day but on a remote mooring at night it could well be intrusive. John


Regulo    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 3:35 PM
  I'm still concerned about this "condensation drain". If it will let water out, it will let exhaust gas out. If it's fitted inside, that's exhaust gas inside the boat. How can that be safe?

Regards, Ray.


ADI    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 7:45 PM
  if the condensation drain had a pipe on it, it could be routed to the bilge, if the end is under the bilge water it wouldn't allow exhaust gasses out

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


ADI    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 8:15 PM
  Taken from the webasto installation guide

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


L'sBelles    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 8:52 PM
  Which Webasto model does this installation refer to? I looked up the Air Top Evo 55 installation instructions specifically for marine use and that does not mention condensation drains. It also states that if the exhaust is over 2 metres it should not have a silencer fitted anyway!


ADI    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 10:10 PM
  Webasto Installation Instructions Marine heating systems

Air heating:
Air Top 2000ST®
Air Top 3500®
Air Top 5000®
HL 90®
Water heating:
Thermo Top C®
Thermo 90 ST®
DBW 2010, 2016®
Thermo 230, 300, 350®

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Regulo    -- Oct-8-2020 @ 11:01 PM
  If your exhaust runs downwards all the way (mine does), there's no need for a drain. It's all in stainless, so won't be a problem if there's a bit of moisture in there. It won't be there long after you start it, anyway!

Regards, Ray.

This message was edited by Regulo on Oct-8-20 @ 12:02 AM


Paladine    -- Oct-9-2020 @ 3:38 PM
 
These are the instructions to which ADI refers https://www.butlertechnik.com/downloads/Webasto_Install_Instructions_Marine_heating_systems.pdf

The instructions only relate to the specified Webasto products and include this safety warning:
If you want to install a Webasto® heater system yourself: The installation assumes that you have sufficient technical and craft knowledge and skill. Unskilled installation can endanger life! Before first use, the heating system must be checked by an authorized Webasto® Partner!This is both for your safety and for the safety of third persons.

It seems they only suggest a condensation drain if the length of the exhaust exceeds 2 metres.

I’ve attached a photo of my own installation (an Eberspacher) and there is certainly no drain fitted to the exhaust (the white pipe) and it’s never caused any problem.


"..for the avoidance of any doubt, the broads are not legally a national park and do not come under the national park legislation, and nor will they."
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for DEFRA (Hansard 2015)


ADI    -- Oct-9-2020 @ 8:02 PM
  Thanks Pally it's very helpful to see other people's installations, just need to source some appropriate fuel pipe now, I believe it has a safety code on it.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Steve51    -- Oct-9-2020 @ 8:25 PM
  Either copper or ISO 7840 A1 rubber.

Steve. CM1 and NR12


Paladine    -- Oct-15-2020 @ 7:38 PM
 
Tragic, but a timely reminder that diesel fumes can kill - quickly.

https://www.gov.uk/maib-reports/safety-warning-about-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-after-the-loss-of-2-lives-on-the-motor-cruiser-diversion



"..for the avoidance of any doubt, the broads are not legally a national park and do not come under the national park legislation, and nor will they."
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for DEFRA (Hansard 2015)


Steve51    -- Oct-16-2020 @ 7:55 AM
  Thanks for posting that link Pally. I note from reading the full report that the source of co was the silencer, which wasn't inteneded for marine use. Highly relevant to this thread.

Due to the nature of my job (until I retired), I have been banging on about the dangers of carbon monoxide for years.

Steve. CM1 and NR12


ADI    -- Oct-16-2020 @ 7:51 PM
  Yes thanks for posting definitely important to double check everything and make sure exhaust fittings are sealed, i have had a carbon monoxide alarm fitted for 11 years and replaced last year, it occasionally goes of on windy days when the canopy is back due to exhaust fumes being blown in, but a rare occurrence.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


ADI    -- Oct-16-2020 @ 7:54 PM
  Just want to add I wont be using the silencer as the exhaust run will be about 1.5 meters.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Regulo    -- Oct-16-2020 @ 8:22 PM
  Safety above all else. Hope all goes well with your installation, Adi. Regards to you all.   Smile

Regards, Ray.


Steve51    -- Oct-17-2020 @ 9:38 AM
  A friend of mine removed this heater from a boat on safety grounds. The owner had it positioned in the cockpit with the exhaust pointing at a vent in the hull, but not actually connected to a skin fitting. When the red outer case is removed, it reveals a plastic fuel tank sitting on top of the heater body and all the fuel piping connected in windscreen washer tubing. The really frightening thing is, these are sold like this online. The only modification the owner made was to screw bits of wood to the bottom, presumably to give it some sort of stability. According to the owner, it worked a treat!! I bet it did. Scared

Steve. CM1 and NR12


Steve51    -- Oct-17-2020 @ 9:39 AM
  Adding the photo would be helpful!

Steve. CM1 and NR12


Regulo    -- Oct-17-2020 @ 10:15 AM
  Do people really put so little value on their lives, and those that they love? Shocking.  Frown

Regards, Ray.


ADI    -- Dec-9-2020 @ 10:22 PM
  Does anyone know of any 4mm ID fuel hose struggling to find any with the ISO7840 markings on, or will 5mm be ok when the jubilee clip is tightened?

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Pulse    -- Dec-10-2020 @ 9:15 AM
  Adi i used these on mine
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-x-Jubilee-Hose-Clips-Mini-Hose-Clamp-Fuel-Line-Diesel-Petrol-Pipe-Clip-Clamps/114373355325?hash=item1aa12ee73d:g:SacAAOSwCh5fQ57O



i believe 8mm to 10mm i used

This message was edited by Pulse on Dec-10-20 @ 10:16 AM


annville    -- Dec-10-2020 @ 10:13 AM
  Hi Ray You shouldn't use jubilee clips on fuel hose you should use clamps these tighten/squeezes equally all around fuel hose, it should have a interference fit to the pipe, have you tried A S A P for the correct hose if no joy there is a hose supplier on water front in Yarmouth forgot name but faces dock down far end try googling.  John


annville    -- Dec-10-2020 @ 3:02 PM
  Just noticed i said Ray should have said Adrian in above reply, Sorry. John


ADI    -- Dec-10-2020 @ 9:27 PM
  Thanks for the reply's regarding the hose clips, taken on board, the search goes on for the 4mm ID hose.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Paladine    -- Dec-10-2020 @ 10:02 PM
 
ADI, I have no expertise in this matter, but looking at this web site https://www.bowerspartsonline.co.uk/brands/eberspacher/fuel-system-parts I notice the Eberspacher Heater ISO7840 Marine Copper Fuel Pipe is 4mm OD and the  Eberspacher Heater Fuel Hose 3.5mm ID, so I'm wondering if you actually need 3.5mm ID tubing to provide an interference fit, as suggested annville, if, of course, you're connecting to 4mm copper tubing.

"..for the avoidance of any doubt, the broads are not legally a national park and do not come under the national park legislation, and nor will they."
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for DEFRA (Hansard 2015)


billmaxted    -- Dec-11-2020 @ 8:34 AM
  Adrian, merry Christmas, many french classic cars use 4mm fuel lines.  You might find that specialist parts suppliers for them might be a source

Bill...(The Ancient Mardler)


annville    -- Dec-11-2020 @ 10:20 AM
  Hi Adrian As Paladin is saying if you are connecting to 4mm copper pipe 3.5mm hose would be suitable PROVIDING! you don't have to force the hose on, a genteel wiggle as you push the hose on is all that is required,  fuel hose doesn't have much give as it is reinforced and has no natural rubber in it,  when pushed on to the pipe a genteel tug with fingers shouldn't move the hose, on vehicles the hose these days is self gripping and doesn't need a clip as pipes have a ridge, boat pipes often don't so clamp is required to stop hose sliding of and for safty,   fuel tightness is by the interference fit but not so tight as to split the hose over time. John


L'sBelles    -- Dec-11-2020 @ 4:27 PM
  Surely the "fit" and "securing mechanism" is dependent upon where the hose is used.
If the hose is a feed from the tank to the suction side of whatever pump you are using then the fuel in the hose will be at low pressure and a decent fitting pipe and jubilee clip or similar will do the job. It could be a different story on the discharge side of the pump because there shall need to be sufficient pressure to atomise the fuel when it is injected into the burner.
Have you actually measured your spiggot at 4mm (5/32")? If it really is 4mm and most of the usual suppliers only offer 5mm you could contact the heater manufacturer for a supply of hose to a suitable standard.


palmtree    -- Dec-11-2020 @ 8:48 PM
  I think the pump is low pressure output and just drips the diesel onto a hot wire mesh atomizer in the heater it vaporizes and then burns. Therefore the fuel line clips found by Pulse are fine and are also the type of clamps supplied by the makers of the heaters.

Ian




annville    -- Dec-12-2020 @ 10:34 AM
  Hi Ian yes fuel supply to diesel heaters of Eberspacher, Webasto type etc are low pressure,as is the supply from fuel tanks to pumps,   high pressure FUEL supply must be by pipes with a nut and olive connection, these aren't any more leak proof than rubber hose with clamp BUT are safer as not able to come undone under pressure and flood engine room with fuel. John


palmtree    -- Dec-13-2020 @ 9:03 AM
  John/Annville, in my limited experience of Diesel heaters (the subject of this topic) i have never seen a high pressure fuel supply to them. Can you explain the type of marine heater that uses one?

Thanks

Ian


annville    -- Dec-13-2020 @ 1:14 PM
  Hi Ian Not of hand those that are high pressure the high pressure side would be part of the heater in side the heater, if the supply from the pump is high it would have a olive & nut connection, otherwise ie Eberpacher/Webasto/Hurricane and Kubola a hose and clamp supply would be normal, installation instructions should clarify this. John


ADI    -- Dec-20-2021 @ 8:23 PM
  Hi just wondering what sealant to use on the exhaust pipe to seal it to the heater and skin fitting? how about this geocel-trade-mate-plumber-flue-silicone-black

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


Greybeard    -- Dec-20-2021 @ 11:12 PM
  I never used any sealers, but you must use high quality clamps, stainless "mikalor" are very good, they have a saddle that clamps evenly around the entire fitting making a gas tight seal.

the cheap screw clamps that are supplied with some heaters are not fit for purpose, except for the hot air side.

my appearance is down to me, my attitude is down to you.


annville    -- Dec-21-2021 @ 12:11 PM
  Hi Adrian yes that would be ok , Why do you need a sealant not usually needed, there should be a tight fit between hose and hull fitting with a clamp there to stop it coming of,  there isn't any pressure as exhaust gas is just blowing through to atmosphere the hose needs to point/slope downwards at the fitting to stop/allow water to run outside and not back to heater. John


ADI    -- Dec-21-2021 @ 8:56 PM
  Oh okay I just thought with Co2 its best to be belt and braces, but yes it is a snug fit so when clamped should be ok.

Regards

Adrian  Michelle

Beck  Braydon and Mere.


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